NAU

Earth Notes
9:31 am
Wed July 22, 2015

Earth Notes: John Collier Jr.

Anthropologist John Collier Jr.
Credit Courtesy

Can analyzing pictures of Native peoples help others understand the cultures they live in? More than 20 years after the death of John Collier Jr., his fellow anthropologists continue to do just that. And Collier’s textbook on what he called “visual anthropology” is still widely used.

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KNAU and Arizona News
7:50 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Brain Food: Following The Sand In The Colorado River In Grand Canyon

3-D images show the deposition and transport of sediment along the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon
Credit NAU Geology

Researchers studying sand deposits along the Colorado River are cautiously optimistic that controlled water releases from Glen Canyon Dam are restoring sandbars in the Grand Canyon.

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Earth Notes
5:00 am
Wed July 15, 2015

Earth Notes: Protecting the Bear's Ears

Credit Bears Ears Coalition

Among the most prominent landmarks of southern Utah are the Bear’s Ears—a pair of buttes south of the Dark Canyon Wilderness that are visible for many miles. They’re known to Navajo people as the birthplace of the celebrated “Headman” Manuelito, who was known for resisting federal efforts to forcibly remove Navajos from the region.

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KNAU and Arizona News
4:19 am
Thu July 9, 2015

Dark Chocolate Is The New Brain Food

It's official: dark chocolate is good for us! That's according to the first-ever chocolate study to measure brain waves. It was conducted by Larry Stevens, a clinical psychologist and professor at Northern Arizona University.

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Earth Notes
5:00 am
Wed July 1, 2015

Earth Notes: Nature, Teaching Quietly

Nature makes people feel better. Studies have shown that hospital patients who can see a natural scene from their window—or even an image of nature—typically heal faster than those cut off from the outdoors.

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KNAU and Arizona News
9:37 am
Fri June 26, 2015

Inventory of Native Pollinators Aids Climate Change Research

A pan trap at the mixed conifer site below the San Francisco Peaks.
Credit Melissa Sevigny

Honeybees have been in the news lately because they’re disappearing. They’re crucial to food production, but they’re not native to North America. Now some scientists are turning their attention to the importance and health of native pollinators. Researchers are using the elevation of the San Francisco Peaks to study how local insects might respond to a warming global climate.

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KNAU and Arizona News
5:00 am
Thu June 25, 2015

House Bill Would Expedite Forest Health Projects on Federal Lands

A wildland firefighter burns grasses with a drip torch during a prescribed burn at the Gus Pearson Natural Area in the Ft. Valley Experimental Forest on the Coconino National Forest.
Credit Jake Bacon/Ecological Restoration Institute

A bill making its way through Congress is designed to speed up the process of forest restoration and recovery projects on federal lands. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the Resilient Federal Forests Act would streamline the process of combating catastrophic wildfire.

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KNAU and Arizona News
4:45 am
Thu June 25, 2015

Brain Food: Did The Earth Just Move?

A map of Arizona's seismic hot spots
Credit Arizona Earthquake Information Center

This region is not a place known for powerful earthquakes, but over the last year or so, there have been some memorable ones: the kind that wake you from a sound sleep and set your heart racing. Are they leading up to something bigger? Geologist Paul Umhoefer doesn't think so.

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Southwest Book Reviews
4:23 am
Tue June 23, 2015

KNAU's Southwest Book Review: Denice Turner's "Worthy"

Denice Turner's new memoir "Worthy" (2015)
Credit University of Nevada Press

The premise of Denice Turner's new memoir Worthy is about being raised in a Mormon household in suburban Utah, trying to find her place in the Church. But it's also about Turner's struggle to win the love and acceptance of her mother: a woman whose severe bipolar disorder was repeatedly misdiagnosed throughout her lifetime. That theme is what caught the interest of KNAU's Southwest Book Reviewer Mary Sojourner, and it ended up bringing the two writers together in a very cathartic way.

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KNAU and Arizona News
1:43 pm
Fri June 19, 2015

Scientists Call for a Moratorium on Unconventional Oil

A group of scientists is calling for a moratorium on the development of tar sands and oil shale in North America. The Colorado River Basin contains the largest untapped deposits of oil shale in the world.

More than 100 scientists have asked policy leaders to consider the potential global impacts of developing tar sands and oil shale. They say the carbon-intensive extraction process is incompatible with limiting climate change.

Thomas Sisk, an ecology professor at Northern Arizona University, is one of the lead authors.

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