Melissa Sevigny

The Flagstaff Festival of Science begins today and this year the theme is “the science of change.” Two local artists have teamed up to create a musical experience about wildfire and climate change. Shawn Skabelund is a sculptor and Janice ChenJu Chiang is a pianist. Together they’ve planned a piano concert that takes place in a room transformed into a forest.


This weekend is the 10th anniversary of Flagstaff’s Pickin’ in the Pines Bluegrass and Acoustic Music Festival. In that time, hundreds of national and regional artists have taken the main stage, including the Mars Hillbillies. They’re as local as it gets. An acoustic string band from Flagstaff, they’ve been together for more than a dozen years and have played Pickin’ in the Pines many times. They’ll do it again this anniversary weekend. The Hillbillies recently stopped by KNAU for a jam session and an interview with Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius.

James Minchin

Musician Michael Franti has built a career on blending catchy tunes with socially conscious lyrics. He’s currently touring the world with his band Spearhead, and tonight they perform in Flagstaff. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius caught up with Franti by a scratchy phone connection while he waited for his plane to take off from the Calgary International Airport. 


Folk singer Todd Snider has been on the road for nearly a quarter century. He’s a prolific songwriter with a penchant for hilarious and poignant storytelling. Snider is on tour, celebrating the 10th anniversary of his breakthrough album, East Nashville Skyline, and is performing in Flagstaff tonight. He recently spoke with Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius about the bizarre experiences that inspire many of his songs, and his new memoir, "I Never Met a Story I Didn't Like: Mostly True Tall Tales."

Jill Richards of Jill Richards Photography

Last month, the Flagstaff music community lost one of its most skilled and influential members to cancer. Steve Reynolds, 66, was a veteran guitarist, singer and songwriter who combined elements of folk, blues, jazz and rock to create a singular style. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, Reynolds’ family and friends are paying tribute by putting the finishing touches on an unreleased album he left behind.