Mexican gray wolf

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Federal wildlife officials say the number of endangered wild Mexican gray wolves in Arizona and New Mexico has reached its highest number since the recovery program began nearly 20 years ago.

FRIENDSOFANIMALS.ORG

Federal officials want to release two packs of Mexican gray wolves in wilderness areas near the Arizona-New Mexico border this year in an effort to bolster a struggling population threatened by inbreeding.

It will ultimately be up to New Mexico and a federal court whether that happens since the state and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are locked in a legal battle over the endangered predator.

ENDANGEREDWOLFCENTER.ORG

Officials with the Mexican wolf recovery program say they're finding evidence of success in cross-fostering.

The Arizona Game and Fish Department, Chicago Zoological Society, Endangered Wolf Center and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are working to reintroduce the Mexican wolf to its native habitat in Arizona and New Mexico.

In April, five Mexican wolf pups were born at Brookfield Zoo in Illinois.

Two pups were placed in the den of the Arizona-based Elk Horn Pack of wild wolves with the intention that the pack's adults would raise the two with its own litter.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service must update its decades-old recovery plan for the endangered Mexican gray wolf under a court order issued by an Arizona judge.

Two Western Republican congressmen have succeeded in getting legislation through the U.S. House that would shift management of the endangered Mexican gray wolf from the federal government to states.

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