Mexican gray wolf

endangeredwolfcenter.org

State wildlife officials have voted to increase the practice of “cross-fostering” Mexican gray wolves. That’s the substitution of captive-raised pups for wild ones in hopes of increasing genetic diversity. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

KTAR

 The Arizona Game and Fish Department is suing the federal government to force it to develop an updated recovery plan for endangered Mexican grey wolves.

endangeredwolfcenter.org

An endangered Mexican gray wolf has been shot and killed by wildlife officials in western New Mexico. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the federally protected animal had been involved in so-called “nuisance behavior.” 

  A coalition of environmental groups is threatening to sue the federal government over protections for the endangered Mexican gray wolf.

The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, WildEarth Guardians and Friends of Animals warned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of their intent to sue Tuesday.

It would mark just the latest legal challenge over changes to the wolf reintroduction program that were announced in January. Under the changes, wolves will be able to roam a greater expanse of Arizona and New Mexico and will be released at more sites.

Arizona Game and Fish Department

Federal wildlife officials have confirmed that an endangered gray wolf mistaken for a coyote and killed by a hunter was the same one recently seen near the Grand Canyon. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, Echo — as the wolf had been unofficially named — was the first of its species known to roam the area near the national park in more than 70 years.

endangeredwolfcenter.org

Officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have finalized a new rule concerning the reintroduction of Mexican gray wolves in Arizona and New Mexico. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the move broadens the endangered animal’s territory but also expands the circumstances under which they could be killed.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Arizona Game and Fish Department this month will begin its annual count of Mexican gray wolves. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the agency anticipates a growth in the population of the endangered animals.

Arizona Game and Fish Department

Officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have confirmed that the animal spotted near the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is a gray wolf. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it’s the first of its kind to be seen in the area in more than 70 years.

Southwest Wildlife

A coalition of advocacy groups is suing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over its Mexican gray wolf reintroduction program in the Southwest. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the suit claims the federal agency has not enacted a plan that fulfills requirements made by federal law.

LA Times

Last month, two members of a federally protected population of Mexican gray wolves were found dead in New Mexico. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, that makes three confirmed deaths of the endangered species in the last two months.

Pages