Mexican gray wolf

Mark Henle/The Arizona Republic

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says they do not know why two Mexican gray wolves died after being tranquilized and captured by the agency’s biologists. The deaths happened during the annual population survey of the endangered animals in eastern Arizona and New Mexico. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Wildlife officials are investigating the deaths of two Mexican gray wolves they say were killed after being struck by a field team's tranquilizer darts.

The team of state and federal wildlife officials was surveying the wolves in an annual population count that also involves capturing wolves with tranquilizer darts to attach radio collars to them.

In a statement Tuesday, the Arizona Game and Fish Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said one wolf was darted Jan. 23 and released into the wild before dying four days later.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Four endangered Mexican gray wolves were found dead last December in Arizona and New Mexico. It’s the first time in three months that wildlife officials have reported deaths in the population that makes up the Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

Utah state officials are balking at the possible inclusion of southern Utah in a recovery zone for the Mexican gray wolf.

The Utah Wildlife Board says in a letter sent this week to the Department of the Interior that science shows the northern limit of the species' range is in central New Mexico and Arizona. The board called the plan bad policy, bad science and bad for the Mexican gray wolf.

The board's letter dovetails with a similar one sent last month by Utah Gov. Gary Herbert and governors in Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona.

Don Burkett

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will award more than a quarter-million dollars to Arizona and New Mexico wildlife agencies. The grant is designed to develop nonlethal methods of protection of Mexican gray wolves and livestock. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


endangeredwolfcenter.org

State wildlife officials have voted to increase the practice of “cross-fostering” Mexican gray wolves. That’s the substitution of captive-raised pups for wild ones in hopes of increasing genetic diversity. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

KTAR

 The Arizona Game and Fish Department is suing the federal government to force it to develop an updated recovery plan for endangered Mexican grey wolves.

endangeredwolfcenter.org

An endangered Mexican gray wolf has been shot and killed by wildlife officials in western New Mexico. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the federally protected animal had been involved in so-called “nuisance behavior.” 

  A coalition of environmental groups is threatening to sue the federal government over protections for the endangered Mexican gray wolf.

The New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, WildEarth Guardians and Friends of Animals warned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of their intent to sue Tuesday.

It would mark just the latest legal challenge over changes to the wolf reintroduction program that were announced in January. Under the changes, wolves will be able to roam a greater expanse of Arizona and New Mexico and will be released at more sites.

Arizona Game and Fish Department

Federal wildlife officials have confirmed that an endangered gray wolf mistaken for a coyote and killed by a hunter was the same one recently seen near the Grand Canyon. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, Echo — as the wolf had been unofficially named — was the first of its species known to roam the area near the national park in more than 70 years.

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