Mexican election

Monica Ortiz Uribe

Mexico's oldest political party is back in power.

On Sunday, voters delivered a robust victory to Enrique Peña Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. After a 12-year absence the party that ruled Mexico for seven decades will once again lead the country.

Peter O'Dowd

Standing on the edge of an unfinished railroad bridge outside of Brownsville, Texas, businessman John Wood can see across the Rio Grande into Mexico.

"We are tied together," Wood said of the two countries. "It's kind of like an umbilical cord."

The rail line will connect Brownsville with Matamoros, Mexico, when completed. It's the first of its kind to connect the countries in a century.

Jill Replogle

TIJUANA, Mexico — Enrique Peña Nieto is the kind of politician who elicits screams from young women along with the more sober cheering of other supporters. He’s handsome and smooth, his hair slickly combed back in a slight puff that’s exaggerated in political cartoons and masks of his likeness.