Local News

Navajo Nation

State tribal officials met with Governor Doug Ducey this week for the first Tribal Leaders Summit. It was designed to establish a stronger dialogue between the Arizona officials and Native Nations. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Dean Anderson/Arizona Highways

A new study shows the land proposed for a national monument outside Grand Canyon National Park currently brings more than $50 million in revenue to northern Arizona. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


After smoking, the second-leading cause of lung cancer is colorless, odorless, tasteless—and can come from right underfoot. Radon is a naturally occurring gas formed from the radioactive decay of radium and uranium. Those elements are present in most soils and rocks, though usually in very small concentrations.


Courtesy

Officials at Grand Canyon National Park want to change how the public accesses the area’s backcountry. They say increased visitation is stressing park resources and the canyon’s environment. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Earth Notes: The Southwest’s Nutritional Wonder Tree

Nov 25, 2015

It's tough, spare, and spiny, but the common mesquite tree is a nutritional wonder of the Southwest. 


Cronkite News

Most voting machines are only designed to last about a decade. A new study shows many of the machines in use across the U.S. are close to that age, and that could increase the chances of voting irregularities for the 2016 election cycle. Arizona Public Radio’s Justin Regan reports. 


Mark Rozema

Author Mark Rozema grew up in Flagstaff, but has lived all over the West working as a photographer, fisherman, firefighter and teacher. His first book is called “Road Trip.” It’s a collection of personal essays that chronicle his travels and examine how the natural world molds our relationships. Mary Sojourner interviewed Rozema for this month’s Southwest Book Review.


Deborah Lee Soltesz/Coconino National Forest/USFS

Senators John McCain and Jeff Flake have called on the U.S. Forest Service to increase the scale and speed of large forest-thinning projects in the state. They say more work is needed to protect the forests from catastrophic wildfire. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Thomas G. Whitham

Northern Arizona University’s Southwest Experimental Garden Array will test out the idea of “prestoration”—a kind of ecological restoration that anticipates the expected future climate.


The name is practically as long as the animal itself: the “chisel-toothed kangaroo rat.” It lives in desert landscapes from Oregon and California through Utah and into northwest Arizona. 


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