Local News

Jesse Barber

Many insects and spiders rely on sounds and vibrations to find food, meet mates and detect predators. So it’s likely they’d be sensitive to the roar of heavy machinery. 


Melissa Sevigny

Today’s full solar eclipse was the first in 100 years to stretch from coast to coast in the U.S. Millions of people flocked to the 70-mile-wide path of totality, and one of them is KNAU’s science reporter Melissa Sevigny. She’s on the line with me from Madras, Ore., which was in the center of the path of totality.


NPS/Erin Whittaker

Every state in America will witness at least a partial solar eclipse today. In Arizona the celestial show starts at about 9:15 this morning and ends at noon. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


We are now days away from, what some scientists call, “the most beautiful event in the sky,” a total solar eclipse. Only some US cities will be lucky enough to see the moon completely overtake the sun on Monday, when it a casts a long, thin shadow across the country. KNAU’s science reporter Melissa Sevigny is on her way to Madras, Oregon, one of the cities located in, what’s known as, the path of totality. Melissa spoke with KNAU’s Aaron Granillo before she took off.


Earth Notes: Quiet Parks

Aug 16, 2017
National Park Service

Bugling elk, rolling thunder, the delicate trill of a hummingbird’s wings. These natural sounds can be heard in America’s national parks—some of the quietest places on Earth. 


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