KNAU and Arizona News

Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald

The Environmental Protection Agency has released a preliminary report about the fate of metals contained in the waste spilled last summer from Colorado’s Gold King Mine. The agency says most of metals came to rest in the bed of the Animas River. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


David Wallace/The Arizona Republic

A new study of global weather patterns over the past 35 years supports earlier scientific predictions the southwestern United States will become drier as atmospheric conditions that typically bring the most rain and snow to the region continue to become more rare.

The research supported by the National Science Foundation concludes that what's now considered a normal year of precipitation in the Southwest is drier than it used to be.

The scientists emphasize the new data doesn't prove climate change is responsible for increasing frequency and duration of drought.

Rick Johnson Photography

Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye wants referees who officiate high school sporting events in northern Arizona to take cultural sensitivity training. That’s because this week Navajo female basketball players on the Flagstaff High School team were told to change a traditional hairstyle before a game. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Sonoran Desert NPS

A leech occupies the top spot in the food chain at Montezuma Well near Camp Verde. Surprisingly, its body contains the highest level of arsenic ever recorded in a living organism.


Conservation CATalyst

The first publicly released video of the only known wild jaguar in the United States shows the giant cat roaming around a creek and other parts of a mountain range in southern Arizona.

El Jefe — Spanish for "the boss" — has been living in the Santa Rita Mountains, about 25 miles south of downtown Tucson, for over three years.

Conservationists tracking the jaguar released a short video Wednesday showing him walking around mountain terrain.

Mark Henle/The Arizona Republic

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says they do not know why two Mexican gray wolves died after being tranquilized and captured by the agency’s biologists. The deaths happened during the annual population survey of the endangered animals in eastern Arizona and New Mexico. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


CBS News

Presidential primaries in Arizona are known as the Presidential Preference Election. A bill under consideration in the House would cut all state funding for those elections and make paying for them the responsibility of political parties. Arizona Public Radio’s Justin Regan reports.


Wildlife officials are investigating the deaths of two Mexican gray wolves they say were killed after being struck by a field team's tranquilizer darts.

The team of state and federal wildlife officials was surveying the wolves in an annual population count that also involves capturing wolves with tranquilizer darts to attach radio collars to them.

In a statement Tuesday, the Arizona Game and Fish Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said one wolf was darted Jan. 23 and released into the wild before dying four days later.

fox5sandiego.com

The Navajo Nation Council has approved the largest spending package in its history. It’ll be funded by a settlement the tribe received from a federal lawsuit, and benefit several water and sanitation projects. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


ADOT

Yesterday’s winter storm was Arizona’s first test of a new kind of snowplow that can clear two lanes at once.


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