KNAU

Earth Notes: Spotted Bats

Feb 22, 2017
Bruce Taubert

In the animal world, spotted bats are standouts as endurance athletes. Weighing about as much as four chocolate kisses, these little flying mammals cover a lot of ground. 


George Andrejko, AGFD

If you’re by a desert spring in far northwest Arizona or southeast Nevada and hear a low chuckle followed by what sounds like fingers rubbing on a balloon, you may have stumbled upon a relict leopard frog.


Scott Thybony

If you’ve done any exploring around the Southwest, you’ve probably visited a few places with rather ominous names: “Bloody Basin,” “Skull Valley,” “The Superstition Mountains.” Seems Arizona is full of places named after grim legends. “Deadman Flat” is no exception. It’s a place writer Scott Thybony has visited many times. In his latest Canyon Commentary, Thybony tells the tale of how “Deadman Flat” got its name. 


Derek Shields/myurbanfarmscape.com

Kids love to play in the dirt. So Flagstaff ecologist Anita Antoninka is channeling that love into learning… using it as a way to teach kids about the effects of climate change on the earth’s biocrust. Today, she’s working with a seventh grade science class at Northland Preparatory Academy to see how a warming planet affects moss.


Earth Notes: Vermilion Flycatchers

Feb 8, 2017
Dyer Lytle

In late February and early March, brilliant red and charcoal male vermilion flycatchers, like valentines on wings, arrive on their breeding grounds along Arizona’s rivers.  


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