KNAU

The West’s pioneer spirit characterizes not only many of the region’s people, but also some of its plants. And a trio of pioneer species collectively called fire mosses, known on every continent, may prove an excellent tool for repairing burned-over lands on the Colorado Plateau.


The “yuk factor” is definitely there: owls regurgitate little packets of undigested bones, fur, and feathers left over from animals they ate a few hours earlier.


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Many visitors know Chaco Canyon National Historical Park as a nexus of spiritual or at least archaeological energy. But these days many park advocates are worried about a different sort of energy: oil and gas production.


KNAU/Bonnie Stevens

If a tree falls in the forest and no one's there to hear, does it make a sound? It definitely makes sound waves, according to wood scientist Dave Auty of Northern Arizona University. Auty uses "acoustic evaluation technology", or sound wave probes, to determine the stiffness and quality of a tree before it's harvested. It's a technique new to northern Arizona forests.


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Roundtail Chub populations have declined to the point where the fish is being considered as a candidate for the Federal Endangered Species Act. But their numbers are just fine in central Arizona. In fact, the Roundtail Chub is thriving on the Salt and Verde Rivers.


On contemporary maps, tribal peoples in the U.S. are closely identified with particular reservation lands. But long-standing ties to land connect Native tribes with a much broader network of places.


onlyinyourstate.com

KNAU commentator Scott Thybony has driven countless miles of dirt road in his quest to track down stories and adventures. His curiosity often lures him down some of Arizona's worst washboard roads. In this month's Canyon Commentary, Thybony  waxes poetic - and mathematical - about the power of a rough dirt road. 


Earth Notes: Bee Houses

Apr 20, 2016

When you hear the word "bee," you're likely to think of the hard-working insects that produce the honey we use. But in North American, a wild diversity of native bees - more than 4,000 kinds – swamps that of honeybees, which were imported from the Old World.


Travelers with a hankering to reconnect with nature and experience the Navajo way of life can do just that 12 miles south of Page.  A bear claw sign on Highway 89 points the way to the Shash Diné Eco-Retreat. “Shash” in the retreat’s name means “bear” in Navajo. 


Courtesy of thetreecenter.com

Voracious Japanese beetles are becoming frequent fliers on airlines traveling from the East Coast to the West Coast. And that’s wreaking havoc on hundreds of species of plants. Ecosystem scientist Bruce Hungate is trying to find out how the beetles are getting their boarding passes. 


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