KNAU

On contemporary maps, tribal peoples in the U.S. are closely identified with particular reservation lands. But long-standing ties to land connect Native tribes with a much broader network of places.


onlyinyourstate.com

KNAU commentator Scott Thybony has driven countless miles of dirt road in his quest to track down stories and adventures. His curiosity often lures him down some of Arizona's worst washboard roads. In this month's Canyon Commentary, Thybony  waxes poetic - and mathematical - about the power of a rough dirt road. 


Earth Notes: Bee Houses

Apr 20, 2016

When you hear the word "bee," you're likely to think of the hard-working insects that produce the honey we use. But in North American, a wild diversity of native bees - more than 4,000 kinds – swamps that of honeybees, which were imported from the Old World.


Travelers with a hankering to reconnect with nature and experience the Navajo way of life can do just that 12 miles south of Page.  A bear claw sign on Highway 89 points the way to the Shash Diné Eco-Retreat. “Shash” in the retreat’s name means “bear” in Navajo. 


Courtesy of thetreecenter.com

Voracious Japanese beetles are becoming frequent fliers on airlines traveling from the East Coast to the West Coast. And that’s wreaking havoc on hundreds of species of plants. Ecosystem scientist Bruce Hungate is trying to find out how the beetles are getting their boarding passes. 


For allergy sufferers, dust and pollen are an irritating part of life in the Southwest. Yet recent research reveals that these tiny particles are crucial to the formation of life-giving rains, both here and around the world. 


Ethan Miller/Getty

Most scientists today prefer the term “climate change” to “global warming,” since human-caused changes to the Earth’s atmosphere produce many changes beyond temperature. But especially in the southwestern states “warming” is an apt term too.

According to a new analysis of monitoring data by Climate Central, the U.S. is warming across the board—but to different extents in different places. And the effect varies by season, too.

Wikipedia

Glyptodonts were giant armadillo-like creatures that went extinct with the last Ice Age. But not before they traveled across the land bridge from South America; some ending up in the Arizona desert near Safford. That's where scientists recently found a pair of their enormous skeletons, remarkably preserved. 


Have cellphone, will travel: that’s the mantra in today’s device-driven world. Now, with a smartphone camera and a special app, a new project is providing virtual tours of archaeological sites in northern Arizona.


NAU/Jackie Thomas

Scientists are trying to project what mule deer on the Kaibab Plateau might need in order to survive a changing climate. The herd lives on a forested "sky island" - an elevated area surrounded by different low-land environments. If the future holds warmer, drier conditions, how would food sources and hiding places change for the deer? That's what Spatial Ecologist Jackie Thomas is trying to find out.

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