KNAU

BBC

The arid Southwest is ideal for preserving plant and animal remains. It's a living laboratory for scientists. At the Ancient DNA Lab at Northern Arizona University, wildlife geneticist Faith Walker is using tiny pieces of mummified biological material to learn more about life on Earth thousands of years ago.


NPS

The Grand Canyon, Wupatki National Monument and Sunset Crater Volcano are some of the geologic and cultural gems of the National Park Service. This summer, KNAU's Earth Notes series will highlight these, and other special places across the Southwest in honor of the Park Service's 100th anniversary. In the fourth installment of the series, we look at northern Arizona's Pipe Spring National Monument and its rich human history.

To many Colorado Plateau tourists, Pipe Spring National Monument is about as far from civilization as it gets—a 40-acre flyspeck tucked onto the vast Arizona Strip between the North Rim of Grand Canyon and the colorful canyon parks of southern Utah.


Kristen Honig/ Valles Caldera Trust

The Grand Canyon, Wupatki National Monument and Sunset Crater Volcano are some of the geologic and cultural gems of the National Park Service. This summer, KNAU's Earth Notes series will highlight these, and other special places across the Southwest in honor of the Park Service's 100th anniversary. In the third installment of the series, we look at the Valles Caldera National Preserve and its ecological recovery from two massive wildfires.

 

New Mexico’s Valles Caldera National Preserve is one of the nation’s newest national parks. It is also a living laboratory.

University of Iowa Press

The Buenaventura is a mythical river that early map makers drew across the Southwest hoping it was actually there. It wasn't. But its legend lured countless explorers to the region in search of abundant water in the desert. That myth is the subject of a new book by KNAU science reporter Melissa Sevigny. In this interview, she tells Arizona Public Radio's Gillian Ferris about the chain reaction caused by the mythical river. 


KNAU/Bonnie Stevens

Flagstaff has long been a training destination for world class athletes. The high altitude makes their bodies produce more red blood cells and absorb more oxygen, which in turn builds their endurance and speed. Canadian exercise physiologist Trent Stellingwerff wants to know what else happens when elite athletes train at 7,000 feet. 


Pages