immigration

Phoenix police have arrested four people for blocking parts of a major downtown road at a protest outside the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement building in Phoenix.

Police moved the crowd off the street at around 12:30 p.m., but four protesters remained including two who chained themselves to ladders.

Activists cheered as handcuffed protesters were placed into squad cars and then calmly dispersed shortly after.

Tom Tingle/Arizona Republic

The board overseeing Arizona's three public universities has voted to grant in-state tuition to young immigrants who were granted deferred deportation status by the Obama administration.

The Arizona Board of Regents has called a special meeting to discuss a court ruling that says young immigrants granted deferred deportation status by the Obama administration should get in-state tuition.

Thursday morning's meeting comes after a judge ruled that young immigrants granted deferred deportation status are eligible for in-state college tuition.

  Sheriff Joe Arpaio has completed his first day of testimony in a hearing to decide whether he should be held in contempt of court for violating orders to stop his immigration patrols.

Arpaio testified for about an hour before the hearing finished for the day. He is expected to be back on the stand Thursday.

The normally defiant and tough-talking sheriff was more mild-mannered and meek than usual as he fielded questions about his immigration efforts. He frequently said "I don't recall" in response to questions.

Monica Brown

Language is powerful. Monica Brown knows that. She's an English professor at Northern Arizona University, a children's author and a Latina. Until last week, Brown had never heard the term "a deportable" used to describe an immigrant to the U.S., and it left her with an uneasy feeling. In this commentary, Brown says there's a ripple effect of negativity when we use language that dehumanizes people.

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