higher education

The Arizona Board of Regents will decide if Arizona State University President Michael Crow and University of Arizona President Ann Weaver Hart get six-figure merit bonuses.

Board members are scheduled to vote Friday on whether Crow gets up to $150,000 in performance incentives. That would bring his total compensation and benefits to about $1 million for fiscal 2015.

Hart could get a $115,000 incentive for total compensation of nearly $754,000.


The president of Northern Arizona University will address the Arizona Board of Regents at its meeting in Flagstaff Thursday. Rita Cheng will update the board on how NAU is faring after state funding to higher education was slashed by nearly $100 million. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Arizona unexpectedly ended the 2015 fiscal year $325 million in the black. As a result, some lawmakers are discussing restoring the funds cut from the state’s three public universities in the current budget. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

The Arizona Board of Regents has approved budget plans for the upcoming fiscal year for Arizona State University, the University of Arizona and Northern Arizona University.

The three universities were cut approximately $100 million in the fiscal year 2016 state budget and funding will be reduced another $6.1 million for health insurance costs.

Previously approved tuition plans for the fiscal year beginning July 1 and student enrollment growth won't offset state funding cuts.

College tuition in Arizona could increase by no more than the cost of living every year and corporations could see tax hikes under a proposed voter initiative.

A group called Save Arizona's Students and Public Universities filed the initiative late last week. It has until July 2016 to collect more than 150,000 valid signatures to qualify for the November 2016 ballot.


Arizona’s most recent budget cut nearly a $100 million from the state’s three public universities. Northern Arizona University alone will lose $17.3 million and officials there have responded with a tuition increase for incoming students and the restructuring of several programs. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius sat down with NAU President Rita Cheng this week to discuss how the university is dealing with the cuts and what the future of higher education in the state might look like.

Mark Henle/The Republic

A recent report shows Arizona leading the nation in cuts to higher education since the Great Recession. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the study comes just months after the state trimmed nearly $100 million from its three public universities.


The presidents of Arizona's three state universities are proposing to increase revenues through tuition or fee increases in the coming school year to make up for part of a $99 million cut in state funding.

The Republic

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey wants the board that oversees the state's three public universities to come up with a new strategic plan that cuts administrative expenses and makes college more affordable.

A House panel voted this afternoon to require students at state universities to pay -- or at least borrow -- $2,000 a year toward the cost of their education. 

Rep. John Kavanagh said students should have some skin in the game, saying they will take their schooling more seriously if they have made an investment. Kavanagh acknowledged that books might add another $1,500 a year.