health

Dierdra Bycura

Regular exercise is good for a lot of things: strengthening muscles, decreasing body fat, even helping us sleep better. Now, new research shows it’s also good for the trillions of micro-organisms in our intestines, which have a profound effect on other systems in our bodies. 


Melissa Sevigny

Summers on the Navajo Nation can be scorching, and many homes there don’t have air conditioners or swamp coolers. But a group of eighth grade students at The STAR School, near the edge of the Navajo Nation, has come up with a solution: a low-cost evaporative cooler they plan to give away to elders. As KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, the project won a statewide science and technology prize.

HYPO2

Flagstaff has long been a destination for elite athletes to train at high altitude. From swimmers at the Wall Aquatic Center to runners on the trails, working out at 7,000 feet can increase oxygen-carrying red blood cells by 4 or 5 percent. Now, new research shows the longer athletes train at high elevation, the better the results. Dan Bergland is a sports physiologist at HYPO2, Flagstaff’s high-altitude training camp. 


Aaron Granillo/KNAU

KNAU checks in with Nephi Craig, a White Mountain Apache Chef, who gives new life to the food his ancestors cooked. KNAU’s Aaron Granillo reports Craig now uses indigenous food as a form of medicine to help fellow Apaches overcome addiction.


Northern Arizona University

People with Parkinson’s disease often develop trouble with their voices; they begin to whisper and mumble. Speech therapy can help, but so can singing. Flagstaff is one of many cities with a Parkinson’s choir. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, the “Mountain Tremors” are finding healing through music.... in the latest installment of Eats and Beats, stories about food and music.

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