grand canyon

KNAU and Arizona News
4:01 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

Vendor supports bottle ban at Grand Canyon

Sunset at the Grand Canyon from Yavapai Point
Tobias Alt

Grand Canyon National Park will begin banning the sale of bottled water inside the park within 30 days.

The decision could cost the park’s concessionaire, Xanterra Parks and Resorts, a pretty penny.

But the company is applauding the park’s decision.

Chris Lane, vice president of sustainability at Xanterra, says the company lobbied for the ban.

“Our foremost goal is to reduce waste and the impacts associated with bottled water," he said.

Fronteras
1:10 pm
Mon January 30, 2012

Blind Youth See the Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon is perhaps the most visually stunning place on the planet. But does it feel the same if you can’t see? A group of blind teenagers are on a two-week trek and rafting adventure at the bottom.

Near the edge of the Grand Canyon Esha Mehta listens to distant thunder and feels cool rain fall on her face.

“My vision of nature comes from the sounds, then I make up what I imagine it to look like,” Mehta says.

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Tusayan Water
2:03 pm
Tue December 20, 2011

Development Plans Raise Water Concerns at Grand Canyon

The water from Dripping Springs in the Grand Canyon National Park supports creature for miles around.
Claudine LoMonaco

Larry Stevens is an evolutionary biologist. For the last 41 years, he’s dedicated much of his life to the study and salvation of springs, little spots where water bubbles out of the earth.

Stevens stands in huge alcove carved out of a sandstone cliff on a remoter trail in Grand Canyon National Park. He holds a measuring cup under a stream of water that drips from a cluster of bright green ferns.

“Dripping Springs is a fairly small spring,” Stevens says. “We’re looking at half a gallon a minute of flow.”

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Earth Notes
12:00 am
Tue November 22, 2011

Earth Notes: Grand Canyon Weather, Right Now

A picture of the Grand Canyon on a snowy day from the southern edge.
Btipling

Each year an average of 250 people are rescued from inside Grand Canyon. Many of them are hikers unprepared for the substantial temperature difference between the top of the rim and inside the canyon. Hikers can be surprised as they start with pleasant 70-degree temperatures at the top and approach a dangerous 100 degrees, or more, near the river.

Now the National Weather Service is working to address that gap in perceptions. With help from the Park Service, it installed two weather stations inside the Canyon: one at Indian Garden Campground, the other at Phantom Ranch.

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