Glen Canyon Dam

Dave Heramimtschuk-USGS/Freshwater Illustrated

Several species of aquatic insects are mysteriously missing from the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. Scientists now know that’s because dam managers rapidly change the river’s level to meet electricity demand.


NPS

Snowpack in the mountains that feeds the Colorado River is slightly above the long-term average this winter — welcome news in the drought-stricken Southwest.

 

But water and weather experts said Tuesday it's too early to predict how deep the snow will get or how much of it will make its way into the river and on to Lake Powell in Utah and Arizona, one of two major reservoirs on the Colorado.

 

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

Federal officials have proposed a sweeping new plan to manage Glen Canyon Dam for the next two decades. They want to be more proactive in their efforts to restore fish and animal habitat as well as beaches that have degraded in the Grand Canyon since the dam became operational in the 1960s. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


US Department of Interior

The public comment period is open for a proposed pipeline that would carry water from Lake Powell to southern Utah.


Frank Talbott via AP

A massive slab of rock is threatening to come crashing down at the base of an Arizona dam.

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is wrapping up a project to replace the giant turbine runners that produce electricity at Glen Canyon Dam.

Rick Clayton works in the bureau's Upper Colorado Region power office. He says energy production from the dam near the Arizona-Utah border is expected to increase by 3 percent when the work is done this year.

The dam that holds back Lake Powell produces enough energy to power about 600,000 households annually.

The price tag for replacing the eight turbines is almost $40 million.

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

Colorado River managers are releasing nearly a third more water than usual this month from the Glen Canyon Dam. As Arizona Public Radio’s Justin Regan reports, the high flow will restore parts of the Grand Canyon’s environment.

Federal Court Rejects Annual Glen Canyon Assessment

Aug 13, 2012

A federal appeals court on Monday rejected a bid by the Grand Canyon Trust to force annual environmental assessments on operation of the Glen Canyon Dam.

Randall Babb / Arizona Game and Fish Department

There was a time when scientists feared the demise of an ugly little fish called humpback chub, which has lived in southwestern rivers for millions of years. One of its last holdouts is in the Grand Canyon section of the Colorado River at a major tributary, the Little Colorado. Glen Canyon Dam took its toll on the little fish, and by the late 1990s, its population plummeted to a few thousand.

But these days, the humpback chub appears to be making a comeback.

Laurel Morales

The Colorado River is about to run wild again, at least a couple times a year. In May, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar approved a series of simulated floods -- releasing huge amounts of water and sediment from the Glen Canyon Dam over the next several years. It’s all part of a long-studied effort to restore the river environment downstream.

Five boats recently launched a two-week Grand Canyon river trip. The group of tourists paddled white-water rapids, hiked side canyons and camped at river’s edge.

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