Glen Canyon Dam

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

Jan. 21, 1963, marked a watershed in the history of the Southwest. On that Monday, the first gates of Glen Canyon Dam were closed.


MELISSA SEVIGNY

Federal regulators have given the go-ahead for environmental studies and public comment about a proposal to build a 140-mile (225-kilometer) pipeline to draw water from the Colorado River to serve southwestern Utah communities.

The Katie Lee Collection/Northern Arizona University Special Collections

Just a few weeks ago, KNAU’s Gillian Ferris brought us the profile of legendary environmental activist Katie Lee. She’s best known for her fierce opposition to the Glen Canyon Dam and the destruction of upstream canyons now submerged under Lake Powell. Sadly, that interview was one of the last Katie Lee would give. She died this week at her cliff-side home in Jerome, just a few days after her 98th birthday.  Today, we have this remembrance of the Goddess of Glen Canyon. 


Martin D. Cligan

Long-time environmental activist and folk singer Katie Lee has died at the age of 98 at her home in Jerome. 

Martin D. Cligan

Today, we bring you the profile of a woman who’s been fighting to protect wilderness for most of her nearly 100 years. Katie Lee—activist, folksinger and native Arizonan—was on the forefront of the fight to stop the construction of Glen Canyon Dam and the subsequent flooding of Glen Canyon. Katie Lee lost that battle, but she never let go of her fervor to save wild places. Her grit continues to inspire young activists around the world. KNAU’s Gillian Ferris has this profile of The Goddess of Glen Canyon. Just a heads up … this piece contains some colorful language. 


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