Four Forest Restoration Initiative

The Nature Conservancy

Two workshops are scheduled this month for public comment on draft alternatives for thinning and related work to rehabilitate forested areas of eastern Arizona.

Melissa Sevigny

Forests in northern Arizona have a problem: massive piles of wood chips left behind from thinning projects. They can’t stay in the forest because of the fire danger and there’s no local market for them. But they have to go somewhere. A new experiment is testing the idea of burning them along with coal to generate electricity. It’s not easy to do, but if contractors can sell wood chips to power plants, that could speed up forest restoration.


Dan Kipervaser/4FRI

A kind of ecological treasure hunt is underway in northern Arizona … for thousands of springs scattered across the landscape. It’s such a vast area it’s hard to find them and monitor their health. So scientists are training ordinary citizens to help them in the search.


Salt River Project

Two students at Northern Arizona University have developed a first-of-its-kind methodology for calculating the carbon stored in forests. They want to use it to generate funds for restoration.


Deborah Lee Soltesz/Coconino National Forest/USFS

Senators John McCain and Jeff Flake have called on the U.S. Forest Service to increase the scale and speed of large forest-thinning projects in the state. They say more work is needed to protect the forests from catastrophic wildfire. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


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