forest restoration

Coconino National Forest

Wildfire seasons in the West are growing longer and more intense. So more prescribed burns are happening to protect forest towns in places like northern Arizona. That can be hard on the health of residents and firefighters. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, not much is known about the long-term effects of breathing forest fire smoke.

The Nature Conservancy

Wildfires have been growing bigger and more catastrophic in recent decades. In Arizona, the record for the largest wildfire has been broken twice in the past 16-years with the Rodeo-Chediski and Wallow Fires. A film screening tonight in Flagstaff explores the wide-ranging impacts and potential solutions to these mega fires. Kristin Atwell produced and wrote the film, “Fire and Water: Restoring Arizona’s Forests.” She spoke with KNAU’s Aaron Granillo.


Dyan Bone/U.S. Forest Service, Southwestern Region, Kaibab National Forest

A new study from Northern Arizona University outlines the economic impact in the case of a catastrophic wildfire on Bill Williams Mountain. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Melissa Sevigny

How much would you pay to restore the forest around you? A new economic study says the better your view, the tighter your purse strings. Researchers at Northern Arizona University surveyed Flagstaff residents and discovered people who can see the San Francisco Peaks from their house are less willing to pay for forest restoration projects meant to protect the town from catastrophic wildfires. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with the study’s lead author, Julie Mueller.


Melissa Sevigny

Yesterday we heard about northern Arizona’s tree thinning projects and who makes the decision on which trees to cut. In part 2 of that story, what happens to those trees afterward? Flagstaff has always been a logging town, but things have changed. When the U.S. Forest Service began to thin the woods almost a decade ago reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires, some thought it would bring a second economic boom for the logging industry. As KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, that heyday hasn’t happened.

Pages