food

FEWSION

When we sit down to dinner, it’s easy to forget where our food comes from, besides the local grocery store. But understanding the source-to-consumer pipeline for key resources is crucial in planning for disruptions and natural disasters.

New Mexico History Museum

In 1846, U.S. soldiers swept down the Santa Fe trail to seize the province of New Mexico for the United States. Santa Fe was then part of Mexico, and for a time during this war soldiers camped in the roomy courtyard at the city’s Palace of the Governors. One soldier wrote an evocative description that includes mention of baking ovens there.


Aaron Granillo/KNAU

KNAU checks in with Nephi Craig, a White Mountain Apache Chef, who gives new life to the food his ancestors cooked. KNAU’s Aaron Granillo reports Craig now uses indigenous food as a form of medicine to help fellow Apaches overcome addiction.


Aaron Granillo

This time last year, KNAU brought you the story of Nephi Craig, an Apache chef reviving the cuisine of his ancestors. He believes food can help his people recover from a dark past that includes war, relocation and a food-related health crisis. The story went on to win a national Edward R. Murrow Award. Aaron Granillo was the reporter on the piece. Gillian Ferris was the editor. They are in New York City today to accept the award for best writing. Before they left, Aaron and Gillian sat down for a reporter’s notebook, a look behind the scenes of the original story.


Aaron Granillo/KNAU

It’s mushroom hunting season in Northern Arizona. People come from all over to forage edible fungi from the monsoon-soaked woods, and they’re cooking up some tasty dishes. KNAU’s Aaron Granillo has this audio postcard in the latest installment of our occasional series, Eats and Beats, stories about food and music.


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