farms

Arizona Department of Water Resources

The Central Arizona Project has abandoned a plan to purchase seven farms in Mohave County and transfer the water to central Arizona. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Melissa Sevigny

Arizona’s Verde River has a lot of competing uses: city dwellers, farmers, kayakers and environmentalists all want its water in different ways. But a new project aims to unite everyone over a glass of beer. A farm in Camp Verde has planted a crop of malt barley, to conserve water and give Arizona breweries a key ingredient to craft a truly local beer. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports. 

Melissa Sevigny

Demand for local, sustainable beef is on the rise. But getting into the alternative beef business isn’t easy. In drought-stricken Arizona, grass and water are in short supply, and the infrastructure—like processing plants—isn’t in place for robust local markets. So how does grass-fed beef get from pasture to plate?

Farmers in central Arizona are working together to protect a precious resource that flows through their land. The Verde River supplies every drop of water they use for irrigation, and everything else in their lives. As the drought swallows up lakes and rivers across the West, Verde Valley farmers are embracing new and old technology to ensure their water supply doesn’t dry up. Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports.

In spring farmers and gardeners feel that irresistible pull to get their hands in the dirt.

If you share that urge, a program exists to satisfy it almost anywhere you go. It’s called Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms, or “WWOOF” for short, and it links willing hands with farms that host volunteer workers.