Endangered Species

Steve Hillebrand, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are one ecosystem—a diverse and rugged desert—but they’re split by hundreds of miles of fences and vehicle barriers. Scientists want to know how the current U.S.-Mexico border wall affects wildlife, and what will happen if that barrier is made more impenetrable. As KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, doing research in this region is fraught with complications.

Wildlife officials have confirmed that two endangered Mexican gray wolf pups died last month.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service decided today not to list two Colorado River Basin minnows under the Endangered Species Act. Arizona Public Radio’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Program in eastern Arizona and New Mexico has long been hindered by illegal killings of the endangered animals. A recent study concluded it’s as big a factor in the population’s recovery as genetic diversity and health. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


Earth Notes: Endangered Razorback Suckers

Mar 15, 2017
Travis Francis

With humped back and small eyes, the razorback sucker is an odd-looking fish. Native to the Colorado River basin but now endangered, it’s been found recently in an unexpected place, the large artificial reservoir of Lake Powell.  

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