Endangered Species

Gary Kramer/USFWS

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has agreed to a deadline to craft a recovery plan for the endangered Mexican gray wolf.

The agency reached a settlement with environmentalists, Utah and Arizona, but it still needs the approval of a federal judge.

Farm bureaus in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah are expected to challenge the settlement, saying it places an unfair burden on the American public when the wolves' historical range includes Mexico.

Arizona Game and Fish Department

There’s been a mysterious drop in the number of endangered black footed ferrets in Arizona. They are the only ferret species native to North America, and researchers think disease, drought and other environmental factors could be affecting their populations. As Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports, the ferrets might not even be around today if it wasn’t for a dog named Shep.


endangeredwolfcenter.org

Wildlife managers, conservationists and business interests are meeting in Denver as the Western Governors Association looks for ways to change the way endangered species are protected.

They'll spend Wednesday and Thursday talking about the states' role in deciding what species get protection under the federal Endangered Species Act and how conservation is paid for, among other topics.

Conservation CATalyst

The first publicly released video of the only known wild jaguar in the United States shows the giant cat roaming around a creek and other parts of a mountain range in southern Arizona.

El Jefe — Spanish for "the boss" — has been living in the Santa Rita Mountains, about 25 miles south of downtown Tucson, for over three years.

Conservationists tracking the jaguar released a short video Wednesday showing him walking around mountain terrain.

Mark Henle/The Arizona Republic

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says they do not know why two Mexican gray wolves died after being tranquilized and captured by the agency’s biologists. The deaths happened during the annual population survey of the endangered animals in eastern Arizona and New Mexico. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Wildlife officials are investigating the deaths of two Mexican gray wolves they say were killed after being struck by a field team's tranquilizer darts.

The team of state and federal wildlife officials was surveying the wolves in an annual population count that also involves capturing wolves with tranquilizer darts to attach radio collars to them.

In a statement Tuesday, the Arizona Game and Fish Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said one wolf was darted Jan. 23 and released into the wild before dying four days later.

Chris Parish

A federal court ruled yesterday a lawsuit over lead ammunition on the Kaibab National Forest will be allowed to continue.

Utah state officials are balking at the possible inclusion of southern Utah in a recovery zone for the Mexican gray wolf.

The Utah Wildlife Board says in a letter sent this week to the Department of the Interior that science shows the northern limit of the species' range is in central New Mexico and Arizona. The board called the plan bad policy, bad science and bad for the Mexican gray wolf.

The board's letter dovetails with a similar one sent last month by Utah Gov. Gary Herbert and governors in Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona.

Don Burkett

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will award more than a quarter-million dollars to Arizona and New Mexico wildlife agencies. The grant is designed to develop nonlethal methods of protection of Mexican gray wolves and livestock. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Chris Parish/Peregrine Fund

Saturday is National Public Lands Day. To mark the occasion, biologists at Vermillion Cliffs National Monument near Lees Ferry will release three endangered California condors into the wild. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it’s the 20th year the giant birds have been released in the area. 


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