elections

The Atlantic

The Democratic National Committee, the Arizona Democratic Party and Hillary Clinton's campaign are expanding their challenge over voting rights to Arizona in the wake of its troubled presidential primary.

 

Clinton has made voter suppression and ballot laws in Republican-led states a centerpiece of her campaign as she rallies her base in the 2016 White House race.

Her campaign and Democrats plan to file a lawsuit aiming to force changes in how the state runs its elections.

KPHO/KTVK

Arizona Secretary of State Michelle Reagan has scheduled public meetings to hear voters describe their experiences during the March 22 presidential primary election when many Maricopa County voters endured long lines and wait times.

Reagan says her office and the Legislature may consider proposed changes in the way counties run future elections.

Reagan's first meeting will be held at 5:30 p.m. Monday at the Cartwright School District headquarters at 5220 W. Indian School Road in Phoenix.

Luige del Puerto/Arizona Capitol Times

The Arizona attorney general's office has opened an investigation into House Speaker David Gowan to determine if he misused state resources while campaigning for Congress.

Spokeswoman for the attorney general Mia Garcia confirmed the investigation Thursday but would not go into detail because the investigation is ongoing.

Gowan requested the attorney general look into the issue after the Arizona Capitol Times published an analysis of the Sierra Vista Republican's use of rented state vehicles and his claims for daily per diem payments.

John Samora/The Republic

Arizona Secretary of State Michele Reagan is set to certify results of the March 22 presidential primary that prompted lines of more than five hours after Maricopa County slashed the number of polling places.

Reagan is the state's top election official and will officially release the statewide vote courts and is expected to certify the results on Monday.

The Coconino County Board of Supervisors has certified the results of the March 22 presidential preference election. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Courtesy

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey has signed a measure that significantly expands anonymous political spending in Arizona elections.

The proposal by the secretary of state that was touted as a housecleaning measure increases the influence of dark money groups that can spend money on elections without revealing their donors.

The campaign finance re-write doubles the amount these groups spend on ballot measures and allows nonprofit groups to spend more money influencing elections without having to reveal donors.

David Kadlubowski/The Republic

Maricopa County officials are set to certify the results from last week's presidential primary that prompted lines of more than five hours after the county slashed.

The County Board of Supervisors meets Wednesday morning to do the official canvass and formally approve the results. They're also set to discuss the problems at the polls and review how polling sites were selected and consolidated.

John Samora, John Samora/ The Arizona Republic

The Department of Public Safety says one person has been arrested after a demonstration in the Arizona House visitor's gallery got out of hand.

Capt. Damon Cecil says House security asked the protester to leave but he refused and continued to be disruptive. Cecil says he was arrested for trespassing.

Rep. Eddie Farnsworth says the man dropped to the floor of the visitor's gallery in an apparent attempt to make it harder to remove him. He says officers handcuffed the man and carried him out.

John Samora/The Republic

On Monday, the Arizona Secretary of State apologized to voters who waited for hours to cast ballots during last week’s presidential preference election. Michele Reagan says her office is reviewing the election in Maricopa County, though she refused to take blame for the long voting lines. Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports.


David Kadlubowski/The Arizona Republic

A special Arizona House Elections Committee hearing is set to examine problems that led to long lines at last week's presidential primary election.

The panel has asked Maricopa County Recorder Helen Purcell to testify Monday about the hours-long lines at polling places in the state's largest county.

Purcell cut the number of voting locations from 200 for 2012's presidential primary to 60 at last Tuesday's election. She has taken the blame for miscalculating voter interest.

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