Elections 2012

Ongoing coverage of the 2012 elections.

They say when Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow, it means six more weeks of winter.

When Dixville Notch, in the far northern reaches of New Hampshire, voted just after midnight Tuesday, it didn't predict six more weeks with Donald Trump.

But as with Pennsylvania's groundhog, the results — three votes for John Kasich, the only candidate to visit the town, and two for Trump, along with four for Bernie Sanders and zero for Hillary Clinton — are not necessarily predictive.

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

The Stream is your source for news, photos and analysis from NPR's political team on the ground in New Hampshire. For more coverage and analysis visit NPRPolitics.org or elections.npr.org.

Former President Bill Clinton levied an extended criticism of Bernie Sanders at a campaign stop in which he took issue with "sexist" attacks against his wife.

In the stretch run before the New Hampshire primary, the former president accused Sanders' supporters of slinging vitriol toward Clinton's female supporters, citing the tale of one female blogger who was bullied online.

At midnight Tuesday the residents of tiny Dixville Notch, N.H., will welcome camera crews for the quadrennial ritual of casting the first votes in the nation's first presidential primary.

The remote town near the Canadian border is so small that it has only a roomful of registered voters and zero racial diversity. Its votes in recent cycles have been unreliable indicators of who will win the primary.

But the cameras will be there, nonetheless, because it is first, and because it is a tradition.

For more than two decades, New Hampshire has been a place of redemption for the Clintons. That could come to an end Tuesday night.

The Granite State revived Hillary Clinton's 2008 campaign after a devastating Iowa loss to Barack Obama. That victory helped her become the new "Comeback Kid" — the same moniker her husband claimed after his strong finish in the state in 1992 jump-started his road to the Democratic nomination.

Sometimes it takes a Sunday morning to see how much damage was done Saturday night.

So it was this weekend, in New Hampshire and in the broader national conversation about the 2016 presidential race.

On Saturday night, many observers seized on the meatiest moment from the GOP debate staged here — perhaps the most salient moment of all the debates so far. It was the clash between Chris Christie and Marco Rubio that turned into a stunning exposé of Rubio's technique.

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