elections

Brent Brooks @brentbrooks

Arizona Secretary of State Michele Reagan and Gov. Doug Ducey are set to officially certify the results of a special election on school funding and police and fire pension measures.

Thursday's formal canvass of the election results will certify victories for propositions 123 and 124.

Proposition 123 will boost funding for K-12 schools in large part by tapping the state land trust to help add $3.5 billion in new spending over 10 years. It narrowly passed with less than 51 percent of the vote.

Chad Bricks/12News

A measure that would boost education funding by tapping the state's land trust is surging closer to a victory with new vote tallies.

The votes were enough for Gov. Doug Ducey to declare that Proposition 123 had been approved by voters. The Republican governor said Thursday evening that "the result is clear" and called the results a huge victory for public education in Arizona.

12News

The fate of a plan that would pump $3.5 billion in new money into Arizona's K-12 school system over 10 years was hanging by a thread late Tuesday.

Voters statewide were backing Proposition 123 by slightly more than the 50 percent it needs to win. Maricopa County and many smaller counties had completed counts of Election Day ballots late in the night.

That means final results won't be known until Wednesday at the earliest, and likely later in the week.

Arizona voters head to the polls tomorrow to decide on an Education Finance Amendment, Proposition 123. It would settle a lawsuit brought against the state by public schools for failure to increase K-through-12 funding based on inflation during the recession. It would also give a $3.5-billion-dollar cash injection to public schools over the next 10 years. More than 60 percent of that money would come from the State Land Trust, given to Arizona upon statehood in 1912 as a means to generate revenue for schools. Opponents of Prop 123 say the settlement jeopardizes the land trust and should be paid entirely out of the state’s general fund. Supporters believe it’s an immediate opportunity to pump money into K-through-12 education. Both sides admit it’s a short term plan to the issue of school funding. KNAU reached out to voices on both sides of Prop 123. Morgan Abraham, a Tucson investment advisor and the chairman of the No on Prop 123 campaign, spoke with Arizona Public Radio’s Gillian Ferris. Flagstaff City Councilman, Jeff Oravits supports the amendment and spoke with Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius. 


The Arizona Republic

One of the two ballot propositions Arizona voters will decide in tomorrow’s special election is Prop 124. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it would reform the state’s Public Safety Personnel Retirement System.


KPHO/KTVK

A Chandler lawyer's request to have next week's special election postponed because hundreds of thousands of voters didn't receive their election guides in time was rejected Thursday by Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich.

The state's top legal officer said it was clear Secretary of State Michele Reagan's office violated the law, but there was no legal remedy available.

A frustrated Brnovich said cancelling the election would disenfranchise many more voters who have already cast early ballots than the more than 400,000 who didn't receive election publicity pamphlets.

Danny Miller/The Republic

Arizona Secretary of State Michele Reagan’s office failed to send out publicity pamphlets for next week’s special election to more than 200,000 households with multiple voters in all but Pima and Maricopa counties, her spokesman said Monday.

 

The error has prompted a Chandler attorney to prepare a request to the attorney general to postpone the May 17 election. Voters are being asked in Proposition 123 to boost withdraws from the state land trust to fund education and in Proposition 124 to overhaul the state police and firefighter pension system.

Jacob Stanek/Daily News-Sun

A court challenge prompted by major problems in Arizona's presidential primary heads to a full hearing with testimony expected from experts and voters who allege they couldn't cast ballots.

Monday's hearing in Maricopa County Superior Court comes as Judge David Gass considers a request from the Arizona attorney general's office to throw out the case.

NBC News

A unanimous Supreme Court says an Arizona commission did not violate the principle of one person, one vote when it redrew the state's legislative districts in a way that created some with more residents than others and improved the prospects for Democrats.

 

The justices on Wednesday rejected a challenge from a group of Republican voters who claimed the state's Independent Redistricting Commission illegally packed GOP voters into some districts while leaving other Democratic-leaning districts with smaller populations.

Miguel Otarola/Cronkite News

The Arizona Senate has amended an unrelated election bill to require Maricopa County to at least triple the number of polling places from the number it had in the March 22 presidential primary election.

Maricopa County saw huge lines at many of its presidential primary polling places after it cut the number to 60 from 200 in 2012.

Sen. Kimberly Yee says she worked with the county recorder and Secretary of State to craft the language of the amendment adopted Monday. The underlying bill, House Bill 2017, deals with campaign signs and awaits a formal vote.

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