Earth Notes

The Colorado Plateau is one of North America’s human and environmental treasures. Ancient cultures have called this land of sun-baked deserts and lush mountain landscapes home for centuries. Earth Notes, KNAU’s weekly environmental series, explores the Plateau by telling stories of the intricate relationships between environmental issues and our daily lives.

Rooted in science and wrapped in human interest, the two minute long segments encourage listeners to think of themselves as part of the solution to environmental problems. Upbeat and informative, the program tries to foster hope and dampen despair about the environment, and motivate listeners to become more conscious and informed stewards of the Colorado Plateau.

Donald Chavez

A certain type of sheep that had almost slipped from memory is making a comeback in New Mexico. Dahl sheep are believed to have been raised by Spanish settlers about four centuries ago, but the breed was replaced over time by more common ones. 


DesignBuildBLUFF

Our homes and buildings use a lot of energy. Up to 40 percent of energy bills and carbon dioxide emissions are tied to private homes and commercial buildings. Experts say nearly one-third of this money and energy use is wasted, because many structures were built before modern materials and standards were around. 


DesignBuildBLUFF

In 1960, only 12 percent of U.S. households had air conditioning. Today it’s close to 90 percent. During the same time, the average new house has roughly tripled in size. As a result, air conditioners now consume an estimated five percent of all electricity that’s produced. 


Earth Notes: Tracking Burrowing Owls

May 17, 2017
Courtney J. Conway

In the western United States, a little owl is at the center of a big project. Researchers have outfitted burrowing owls with backpacks containing miniature solar-powered satellite transmitters that reveal the locations of individual owls remotely using live Web maps.


Kaibab National Forest

About a mile and a half from the Jacob Lake Inn sits an old wooden cabin behind a split-rail fence. Climbing the steps of the front porch, visitors are transported back to the early twentieth century. 


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