Earth Notes

The Colorado Plateau is one of North America’s human and environmental treasures. Ancient cultures have called this land of sun-baked deserts and lush mountain landscapes home for centuries. Earth Notes, KNAU’s weekly environmental series, explores the Plateau by telling stories of the intricate relationships between environmental issues and our daily lives.

Rooted in science and wrapped in human interest, the two minute long segments encourage listeners to think of themselves as part of the solution to environmental problems. Upbeat and informative, the program tries to foster hope and dampen despair about the environment, and motivate listeners to become more conscious and informed stewards of the Colorado Plateau.

Earth Notes: Hanging Gardens

Apr 11, 2018
NPS/Pete Sawtell

Hidden within the ocher and vermilion canyons of the Colorado Plateau are lush green edens called hanging gardens. They harbor some of the region’s rarest plants and flowers that exist only in the special zone where water emerges from stone. 

FEWSION

When we sit down to dinner, it’s easy to forget where our food comes from, besides the local grocery store. But understanding the source-to-consumer pipeline for key resources is crucial in planning for disruptions and natural disasters.

Aaron Siirila, CC

The phrase ‘"Black Death" conjures horror for the sheer number of people who died from plague in medieval times. But, the same disease poses a modern threat to wildlife across the Southwest. 


Earth Notes: Mormon Mulberries

Mar 21, 2018
Thompson Mansion

In springtime, the town of Saint George in southwest Utah is an island of green in a sea of rust-tinged rock. The verdant green is from shade trees planted by early Mormon settlers.  A sizable percentage of those are mulberry trees, according to professional arborist and former city forester Mark Hodges.


Google Images

Imagine the thrill of being the first geologist to explore the Grand Canyon. That lucky individual—John Strong Newberry—wasn’t originally a rockhound but instead was a doctor from Ohio. 


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