earth notes

Earth Notes
8:51 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Earth Notes: Sedona Wetlands Preserve

Made up of reclaimed wastewater, the Sedona Wetlands provides a habitat for wild birds.
Credit Courtesy photo

What happens to the water that runs down your kitchen or shower drain? If you live in Sedona, Ariz., the answer is that it helps migratory birds along their way.

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Earth Notes
4:00 am
Wed May 16, 2012

Earth Notes: Osprey

They’re sometimes called fish eagles, for good reason: their diet is almost all live fish. They’re big raptors, hard to miss soaring above the scattered rivers and lakes of the Southwest’s high country. They’re ospreys, birds that belong to the summer skies of the Colorado Plateau.

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Earth Notes
8:46 am
Wed April 25, 2012

Earth Notes: Rattled on the Trail

Few sounds in nature are as instantly recognizable and terrifying as the sudden rattle of a pit viper. No matter how often you’ve heard it, it’s a sound that sends a jolt of adrenaline and raises the hair on the back of the neck.

But look closely, because maybe what you’re hearing isn’t a rattlesnake at all.

It might instead be a close mimic, a gopher snake. With their speckled, earth-tone appearance, these common snakes look something like rattlesnakes, but they aren’t dangerous. In fact, they are highly beneficial and eat large numbers of rodents.

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Earth Notes
9:29 am
Wed November 16, 2011

Earth Notes: Controlling a Weed—With a Bug

Diffuse knapweed
http://beavercreek.nau.edu/Animal%20and%20Plant%20pages/Invasive/Plants/Centaurea%20D.htm

When it comes to controlling the many non-native, invasive plants in northern Arizona, weed warriors call on every tactic in the book. As they seek to minimize the spread of a weed called diffuse knapweed, they’re turning to a tiny ally: a weevil that loves to eat knapweed seeds.

Diffuse knapweed is a low-growing shrub that originated on the Russian steppes. Since the 1980's, it’s taken over roadsides and pastures in the region. It’s a heavy seed producer and a tough competitor against native plants.

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