Colorado Plateau

In 1950, Hosteen Nez found a yellowish rock outcrop not far from Cameron, Arizona. His people, the Diné, called it leetso. Ten years earlier that find would have been no big deal. But with the Cold War heating up, Nez suspected this was the valuable ore geologists said contained uranium.


Earth Notes: American Avocets

Sep 13, 2017
Max Taylor

The American avocet is a rare sight as it migrates across the Colorado Plateau in spring and fall. The birds fly south in the winter to Mexico and the southern United States. They wing their way north in spring, hundreds of miles over arid western lands to reach their summering grounds in the northern U.S. and Canada. 


Kurt Refsnider

Geologists know there’s no better place to see Earth’s history laid bare than on the Colorado Plateau. Prescott College professors Kurt Refsnider and Kaitlyn Boyle make the subject come alive for their students in a novel way—from the seat of a bicycle. 


Arthur Gonzales/iNaturalist

Citizen Science Projects involve a lot of data recording, and you don’t necessarily expect to find anything startling or new. But Forest Service ranger Arthur Gonzales did when he was on a hike with his family near Williams. He was taking photos for a public project on the Kaibab National Forest to document plants and animals when he came across a rare beetle. 


Earth Notes: Honeypot Ants

Aug 30, 2017
Gary Alpert

Feast or famine is the watchword in the Colorado Plateau’s unpredictable climate. To survive lean times, honeypot ants, common in the region, have devised a unique strategy.  


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