Colorado Plateau

Earth Notes: Wind Scorpions

Apr 18, 2018
Gary Alpert

The wind scorpion can be terrifying, both in looks and behavior. But despite the common name, it’s actually not a scorpion or a true spider.


Ryan Heinsius

There’s a new exhibit at the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff—actually, it’s an old exhibit re-imagined. Native Peoples of the Colorado Plateau originally opened in 1980. It was an expansive look at many of the region’s tribal cultures including the Havasupai, Navajo and Hopi. The museum recently unveiled a total makeover of the exhibit, nearly a decade in the making. It was put together in close consultation with the tribes. Dr. Robert Breunig curated both versions, and gave KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius a tour.


NPS

Millions of people visit the Grand Canyon every year. It can be an awe-inspiring experience, especially for those seeing it for the first time. At the Canyon’s South Rim, Louis Le Clair of British Columbia stands in amazement of the Grand Canyon’s majesty and magnitude.


Earth Notes: Hanging Gardens

Apr 11, 2018
NPS/Pete Sawtell

Hidden within the ocher and vermilion canyons of the Colorado Plateau are lush green edens called hanging gardens. They harbor some of the region’s rarest plants and flowers that exist only in the special zone where water emerges from stone. 

FEWSION

When we sit down to dinner, it’s easy to forget where our food comes from, besides the local grocery store. But understanding the source-to-consumer pipeline for key resources is crucial in planning for disruptions and natural disasters.

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