climate change

Melissa Sevigny

Ponderosa pine seedlings are more likely to sprout and thrive in mechanically thinned forests, a new study out of Flagstaff finds.


Anthony Bley / US Army Corps of Engineers

A new greenhouse gas study found the Earth’s land surface actually contributes to the warming global climate, counter to what scientists previously believed.

The study is the first to calculate the global balance of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide. It looked at only “biogenic” greenhouse gases, which come from plants, animals and microbes.

For allergy sufferers, dust and pollen are an irritating part of life in the Southwest. Yet recent research reveals that these tiny particles are crucial to the formation of life-giving rains, both here and around the world. 


Ethan Miller/Getty

Most scientists today prefer the term “climate change” to “global warming,” since human-caused changes to the Earth’s atmosphere produce many changes beyond temperature. But especially in the southwestern states “warming” is an apt term too.

According to a new analysis of monitoring data by Climate Central, the U.S. is warming across the board—but to different extents in different places. And the effect varies by season, too.

David Wallace/The Arizona Republic

A new study of global weather patterns over the past 35 years supports earlier scientific predictions the southwestern United States will become drier as atmospheric conditions that typically bring the most rain and snow to the region continue to become more rare.

The research supported by the National Science Foundation concludes that what's now considered a normal year of precipitation in the Southwest is drier than it used to be.

The scientists emphasize the new data doesn't prove climate change is responsible for increasing frequency and duration of drought.

To avoid the first frost, Navajo herders move their livestock to lower ground when aspen trees drop their leaves. Others watch the stars and the moon to gauge the timing of seasonal movements. But with changing climate in the Southwest, nature’s signs have become less reliable.


USGS

Deserts like the American Southwest are expected to get drier as the climate warms. That’s bad news for soil microbes, according to a global study co-authored by researchers at Northern Arizona University.


John McColgan, USDA

A Flagstaff-led study predicts future wildfires will dramatically increase soil erosion in the American West.


Thomas G. Whitham

Northern Arizona University’s Southwest Experimental Garden Array will test out the idea of “prestoration”—a kind of ecological restoration that anticipates the expected future climate.


Melissa Sevigny

A study published last week identifies regions where climate change is likely to imperil the water supply. The Colorado River Basin is high on the list.  


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