Centennial

-Arizona Centennial
12:47 pm
Tue February 28, 2012

Arizona Centennial Minute: Ranches

Some of [Aztec's] Punchers." Aztec Land & Cattle Company, Holbrook, Ariz. Terr. By Ames, 1877--89.

A cowboy in Arizona today is more likely to drive a pickup truck than ride a horse.  But his dusty boots and sweat-stained hat brim can still be found statewide.

Ranches were here before statehood.  One early Spanish land grant brought the Amados family to Southern Arizona in 1711.  Henry Amado still has his great-grandfather’s branding iron. While it isn’t polite to ask a rancher the size of his herd, Amado has to call in a lot of neighbors during roundup not far from the town of Amado, named after his family.

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-Arizona Centennial
5:00 am
Tue February 21, 2012

Arizona Centennial Minute: Outlaws

Pearl Hart, stage coach robber in Arizona.
Unknown

The Wild West loved its outlaws. Two of Arizona’s most famous lived during the 20th century.

Public Enemy Number One -- John Dillinger -- was a bank robber and killer, but he seemed a glamorous figure during the Depression.

Dillinger and his henchmen fled to Tucson in 1934 after killing two guards during an Ohio jailbreak.  The downtown hotel they checked into caught fire that night.

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-Arizona Centennial
5:30 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

Marine color guard honors Arizona's Centennial

Members of Flagstaff's Marine Color Guard, from left, Pat Carr, Johnny Anaya, and John H. Yazzie, honor Arizona's 100th birthday at the Pioneer Museum in Flagstaff, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2012.
Shelley Smithson

Snow hung on pine branches as Flagstaff’s Marine Color Guard honored Arizona’s centennial this morning at the Pioneer Museum.

Locals visited the museum throughout the day where a new Centennial exhibit is on display.

The exhibit is a preview of a larger exhibit planned for the spring.

It will showcase each decade of Flagstaff’s history.

Sixty eight-year-old color guard member Johnny Anaya was born and raised in Flagstaff.

He says his favorite memories are of the Flagstaff All-Indian Powwow, which occurred every Fourth of July between 1929 and 1980.

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-Arizona Centennial
5:00 am
Thu February 9, 2012

Arizona Highways Celebrates 100 Years of Arizona

If you’re a regular subscriber to Arizona Highways Magazine, you probably noticed something different in the February Issue.

Instead of the colorful photographs of mountains and canyons that have made the magazine famous, it's filled with black and white pictures of cities and cars.

The issue celebrates Arizona's 100 years of statehood.

Robert Stieve, Executive Editor of Arizona Highways, told KNAU's John Stark, the issue was great fun to put together.

-Arizona Centennial
12:49 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

Arizona Centennial Minute: Bucky O'Neill

Bucky O'Neill Cabin, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona
National Park Service inventory

Buckey O’Neill got a lot living done in just 38 years.

Nicknamed for “bucking the tiger” in his favorite card game, he came to Arizona territory at the age of 19.  As a newspaper man in Tombstone, he covered the Earp brothers and may have witnessed the OK Corral shootout.

Then he mined copper at the Grand Canyon, where he built a cabin that still stands.

He served as judge, mayor and sheriff in Yavapai County, and led a posse through Canyon Diablo to capture bandits.

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-Arizona Centennial
12:30 pm
Tue February 7, 2012

Arizona Centennial Minute: Statehood

Arizona became a state on Valentine’s Day 1912.

That date was chosen because it marked a half-century since we’d become a territory…Arizona was made a Confederate Territory on February 14th in 1862.

You know, on Statehood day, there wasn’t a lot of fanfare …Gov. George

W. P. Hunt walked more than a mile to the State Capitol to sign the papers.

We do know the occasion of Arizona’s statehood got some brand new media attention…President Taft’s signing of the papers was the first time motion pictures were taken inside the White House.

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