Salt River Project

Two students at Northern Arizona University have developed a first-of-its-kind methodology for calculating the carbon stored in forests. They want to use it to generate funds for restoration.

Victor O. Leshyk

Climate change scientists know that plants can’t grow larger with extra carbon dioxide unless they also have nitrogen. But a new study coauthored by a Flagstaff ecologist shows fungus can help plants get around that limitation.

In 2015 the EPA issued a Clean Power Plan directing states to limit carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. Under the plan, for example, Arizona will need to cut annual carbon emissions from 40 to 30 million tons by 2030.

The Arizona Republic

The State of Arizona has joined a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over the federal Clean Power Plan. It’s among two dozen states fighting the new regulations that limit greenhouse gas emissions from the nation’s power plants. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 

In the global carbon economy, forests act like leafy savings accounts. They take carbon dioxide from the air during photosynthesis, convert it into biomass, and deposit it for years or even centuries in wood and soil.