Biology

Susannah Porter

Microscopic fossils in the Grand Canyon show evidence of a vampire-like predator that punctured its prey to suck out the innards.


Uzma Tahir

Prosthetic limbs have come a long way since someone first walked on a wooden peg in about 300 B.C. A group of scientists at Northern Arizona University is now working on a way to make a computerized bionic ankle act like a real leg. Inspired by the animal world, they’ve got a new idea about how muscles behave like springs.


macworld.com

Mild winters make skunks more active. Instead of resting and preserving their energy, they venture out of their dens and hunt for food. Tad Theimer is a vertebrate biologist and associate professor at Northern Arizona University.

Brain Food: Valentine's Day In The Natural World

Feb 13, 2014
Trees For Life

As we get ready to celebrate Valentine's Day, Northern Arizona University ecology professor Nancy Collins Johnson reminds us that we can learn a lot about relationships from nature. Collins is a soils expert who studies mycorrhizal symbiosis - or, healthy relationships between fungi and the roots of plants.

Brain Food: Spring-Loaded Muscles

Jan 16, 2014
Danielle Borth, NAU Office of Public Affairs

A Northern Arizona University regents’ biology professor is studying how the speed with which frogs catch insects can improve the mechanics of artificial limbs for humans. Kiisa Nishikawa has discovered the connection is a protein called titin. It essentially enables muscles to “think,” reacting in milliseconds, rather than waiting for a signal from the brain.

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