arizona state capitol

KPHO/KTVK

A Chandler lawyer's request to have next week's special election postponed because hundreds of thousands of voters didn't receive their election guides in time was rejected Thursday by Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich.

The state's top legal officer said it was clear Secretary of State Michele Reagan's office violated the law, but there was no legal remedy available.

A frustrated Brnovich said cancelling the election would disenfranchise many more voters who have already cast early ballots than the more than 400,000 who didn't receive election publicity pamphlets.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey has signed legislation creating a comprehensive state policy on drone use that includes a ban on cities and towns making their own rules regulating the small aircraft.

Wednesday's action comes after Republican Sen. John Kavanagh, cities and towns and other groups negotiated on Senate Bill 1449. Businesses that hope to use drones commercially were pushing for uniform statewide rules.

Danny Miller/The Republic

Arizona Secretary of State Michele Reagan’s office failed to send out publicity pamphlets for next week’s special election to more than 200,000 households with multiple voters in all but Pima and Maricopa counties, her spokesman said Monday.

 

The error has prompted a Chandler attorney to prepare a request to the attorney general to postpone the May 17 election. Voters are being asked in Proposition 123 to boost withdraws from the state land trust to fund education and in Proposition 124 to overhaul the state police and firefighter pension system.

Arizona lawmakers are hoping to wrap up the 2016 legislative session, but first they have to complete votes on bills that have been stalled because of work on a state budget.

The Arizona House alone has set Friday votes on more than 130 bills. Senate calendars hadn't been posted late Thursday.

The House acted on only about two dozen bills Thursday and the Senate voted on a similar number.

Both chambers are aiming to adjourn the session Friday, but there's no guarantee that will happen.

Mark Henle/The Republic

The Arizona Legislature has passed a $9.6 billion budget after a week spent wrangling over additional funding for K-12 schools that wasn't included in the initial agreement.

Lawmakers debated until nearly 2 a.m. Wednesday morning before approving a spending package for the state budget year beginning July 1 that included a small increase in funding for several school line items.

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