arizona state capitol

The Arizona House has joined the Senate in approving legislation cutting state shared revenue from cities or towns that pass regulations conflicting with state law.

Four House Republicans broke ranks to join Democrats in opposing Senate Bill 1487 on Wednesday, but it passed on a 32-28 vote. The Senate passed the bill last month with only GOP support, and it now heads to Republican Gov. Doug Ducey for his signature or veto.

A bill overhauling the state's campaign finance laws that has passed a House panel would also allow politicians to divert campaign contributions to other politicians.

Democratic Rep. Ken Clark says the measure would amount to a fundamental change in state politics that allows politicians to buy votes from colleagues using campaign contributions. Clark calls it the "king maker provision."

Bill sponsor Sen. Adam Driggs added the provision onto a sweeping bill he said is designed to simplify and re-organize the state's campaign finance code.

Flagstaff Dark Skies Coalition

A Senate panel has rejected a measure that would have allowed electronic billboards to shine in two counties in the western part of the state where they have been banned under a 2012 agreement.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle expressed concern the deal would threaten Arizona's billion dollar Astronomy industry that uses the vast stretches of dark sky to gaze at stars and planets.

Rep. Sonny Borrelli sponsored the bill that would have exempted most of Mohave and La Paz Counties from the 2012 agreement that protects dark skies near the state's observatories.

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UPDATE: According to the U.S. State Department, former State Senator Jack Jackson, Jr. is not running for state senate in Legislative District 7.

So far, only one candidate has officially announced her senate run for the state’s largest legislative district, LD-7. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


alamosbasement/12 News

The Senate has rejected a measure that would allow parents to let their children opt out of statewide assessments.

Several lawmakers and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Diane Douglas supported the measure as a way for parents to have more control over their children's education. Republican lawmaker Sen. Sylvia Allen of Snowflake sponsored the bill that would allow parents to let their children opt-out of statewide achievement tests such as AzMERIT.

Photo: Getty Images

The Arizona House has passed a bill Planned Parenthood Arizona says is designed to make it easier to cut it off from Medicaid funding.

House Bill 2599 passed Wednesday on a 35-24 party-line vote without discussion with only Republicans in support. It now heads to the Senate.

The bill allows the state to cut off funding and revoke licenses for providers that fail to segregate taxpayer money from funds used to provide abortions. They also could lose funding if they violated medical waste rules or submitted a claim for procedures associated with an abortion.

A Senate panel has advanced two measures revising state law to get around a lawsuit over bans on plastic bags and disposable products.

The law passed last session prevents cities from banning disposable products and blocks cities from requiring business owners to report energy consumption.

Rep. Warren Petersen sponsored last year's bill and is now sponsoring legislation that splits the provisions into two separate measures.

A.E. Araiza / Arizona Daily Star 2013

Arizona lawmakers delivered a big win for the state’s vocational high schools, known as joint technical education districts. The governor signed a deal late Wednesday, giving back nearly all of the money that was cut from the programs last year. Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports.


Arizona lawmakers have advanced three measures targeting abortion providers after hearings in the Arizona Senate.

Republican Sen. Nancy Barto's Senate Bill 1474 also was sent to the full Senate on Wednesday. It makes it illegal for an abortion provider to sell or otherwise transfer a human fetus or embryo for use in research. Planned Parenthood of Arizona says it doesn't have a fetal tissue-donation program.

AP Photo/Matt York

A Senate panel plans to debate a measure to allow residents to sue the state for enforcing executive orders and actions that may limit a person's constitutional right to bear arms.

Sen. Sylvia Allen of Snowflake sponsored the bill that would require the state to recognize as unlawful any executive order or action that limits a person's Second Amendment rights.

It would prevent cities, counties and towns from knowingly enforcing or cooperating with any order or action that limits those rights.

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