agriculture

Melissa Sevigny

Demand for local, sustainable beef is on the rise. But getting into the alternative beef business isn’t easy. In drought-stricken Arizona, grass and water are in short supply, and the infrastructure—like processing plants—isn’t in place for robust local markets. So how does grass-fed beef get from pasture to plate?

azstateparks.com

A nearly $3 million grant from the federal government will help restore parts of the Verde River. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the funds will boost a decade-long effort by conservation groups and farmers to increase sustainable water use on the river.

Arizona Farm Bureau

Diné College on the Navajo Nation will receive a $200,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture as part of a tribal nutrition program. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the project is designed to combat high rates of diabetes and other health problems.

westernfarmpress.com

People raised in Arizona might be familiar with the five C’s that the state is known for, copper, cattle, cotton, citrus, and climate. As Arizona Public Radio’s Parker Olson reports, one of those five C’s is facing danger from a disease-spreading insect.

Photo by Laurel Morales

Federal officials are cutting off water to some California farms stuck in the worst drought on record. At the same time Arizona farmers are irrigating their fields with the diminishing Colorado River. They’re using the water to grow most of the country’s winter vegetables, and even shipping some crops to China. In the final part of the series Pipe Dreams, a look at the controversy of indirectly exporting water overseas.

Adrian Florido

Imperial County, east of San Diego, has one of the worst childhood asthma problems in California.

Cost of Beef is Inflating Family Grocery Bill

Jul 26, 2012
Erik Calonius

The cost of feeding your family is going up, at least a bit.