abortion

Lucas Jackson/Reuters

The Arizona Senate has given initial approval to a bill opponents say is designed to make it easier to cut off Medicaid funding from Planned Parenthood Arizona and other abortion providers.

House Bill 2599 passed on a voice vote Tuesday and awaits a formal vote. The House passed the bill last month with only Republicans in support.

AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin

The Republican-controlled Arizona House has scheduled votes on three bills already passed by the Senate that target abortion or abortion providers.

Senate Bill 1324 bars doctors from prescribing a common abortion drug after seven weeks of pregnancy and requires it to be taken only in FDA-approved doses. Most abortions using RU-486 are now done at much lower doses. Courts blocked a similar 2012 law.

Photo: Getty Images

The Arizona House has passed a bill Planned Parenthood Arizona says is designed to make it easier to cut it off from Medicaid funding.

House Bill 2599 passed Wednesday on a 35-24 party-line vote without discussion with only Republicans in support. It now heads to the Senate.

The bill allows the state to cut off funding and revoke licenses for providers that fail to segregate taxpayer money from funds used to provide abortions. They also could lose funding if they violated medical waste rules or submitted a claim for procedures associated with an abortion.

The number of abortions reported in Arizona is down.

A state report says there were 12,900 reported abortions performed in Arizona in 2014. That's down 3.7 percent from the 13,401 reported abortions performed in 2013 in Arizona.

About three-quarters of the abortions performed in 2014 involved surgical procedures, while the remainder used a medication-induced procedure.

Arizona's attorney general, Mark Brnovich, won't enforce a disputed section of a new law requiring abortion providers to tell women they can reverse drug-induced abortions until the matter can be sorted in court.

The decision made public Tuesday comes as the state prepares to defend itself in a lawsuit filed by abortion providers.

Critics have said there's no science that shows drug-induced abortions can be reversed, and abortion providers argue it's unconstitutional to require doctors to say something that goes against their medical judgment.

Gov. Doug Ducey signed a bill Monday that requires abortion providers in Arizona to tell women they can reverse the effects of a drug-induced abortion and also bars women from buying any health care plan through the federal marketplace that includes abortion coverage.

The Arizona Legislature has passed a bill that requires abortion providers to tell women the effects of an abortion medication might be reversible.

azlibrary.gov

The Arizona House has approved a bill barring women from buying any health care plan through the federal marketplace that includes abortion coverage.

New Report Shows Increase in State Abortion Numbers

Sep 12, 2014
Bastien Inzaurralde/cronkitenewsonline.com

A new report shows the number of abortions among state residents up slightly last year, with one notable exception. Arizona Public Radio’s Howard Fischer reports.

AP/Ross D. Franklin

Attorney General Tom Horne on Tuesday asked the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that state lawmakers can legally restrict the right of women to a medication abortion if they have justification to do so — and other options remain. Arizona Public Radio’s Howard Fischer reports.

Pages