Talk of the Nation

Weekdays 12:00 pm

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's live, midday news-talk program. Host Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape.

From breaking news, science, and education to religion and the arts, Talk of the Nation offers listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

For two hours each Monday through Thursday, Talk of the Nation listeners weigh-in, share their thoughts and ask questions by calling, emailing, messaging through social media.

On Fridays the conversation turns to the topics of science, with Talk of the Nation: Science Friday with Ira Flatow, focusing on news and issues about the world of science and technology.

A long-time NPR journalist, Conan has been a reporter, editor, and anchor for NPR live events coverage. Conan played a major role in anchoring continuous live coverage of developments during the terrorist attacks and aftermath of September 11, 2001. His broadcasts are marked by their clarity, accuracy and eloquence.

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Remembrances
11:00 am
Tue November 8, 2011

Bert Sugar Remembers 'Smokin' Joe' Frazier

Former heavyweight champion Joe Frazier died Monday night at the age of 67, just a month after being diagnosed with liver cancer. "Smokin' Joe," as he was called, was known for his powerful left hook that knocked down Muhammad Ali in 1971 at Madison Square Garden.

Law
11:00 am
Tue November 8, 2011

Supreme Court Hears Arguments In GPS Case

United States vs. Jones raises questions about the limits of police searches, personal privacy and the use of new technology in law enforcement. At issue is whether police need warrants to attach GPS tracking devices to a cars to monitor suspects' movements for indefinite periods of time.

From Our Listeners
11:00 am
Tue November 8, 2011

Letters: Student Loan Debt And Stay-At-Home Dads

NPR's Neal Conan reads from listener comments on previous show topics, including ways to reduce student loan debt, finding the humor in life as a stay-at-home dad, and what schools teach students about sex.

NPR Story
12:21 pm
Mon November 7, 2011

Traveling With The O'Rourkes On 'Holidays In Heck'

Author P.J. O'Rourke fell in love with his horse, whom he dubbed "Trigger," on his ride through the Tian Shan Mountains. But that doesn't mean he loved the trip.
Adrian Dangar

After retiring as a war correspondent, P.J. O'Rourke decided to travel for pleasure, often with his family.

He went to some dream destinations — Disneyland with the family, Ecuador's Galapagos Islands, Italy's famed modern art exhibit Venice Biennale.

He also took some less conventional journeys — a horseback trek across a mountain in Kyrgyzstan, a voyage down China's Yangzte river, a couple's bird hunting trip.

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Opinion
11:00 am
Mon November 7, 2011

Op-Ed: Iran Losing Pull In Iraq

Originally published on Mon November 14, 2011 9:51 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, host: This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

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Europe
11:00 am
Mon November 7, 2011

Big Problems For The Big Italian Economy

Originally published on Mon November 7, 2011 12:22 pm

Transcript

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Politics
11:00 am
Mon November 7, 2011

Cain's Candidacy Changes The Politics Of Race

For the first time in history two black candidates, President Barack Obama and Herman Cain, may run against each other for the presidency. As it did three years ago, discussions of race and racism continue to play out around both campaigns.

NPR Story
10:00 am
Fri November 4, 2011

Mosquitoes Engineered To Kill Their Own Kind

Reporting in Nature Biotechnology, researchers write of genetically engineering mosquitoes to pass lethal genes to their offspring, in hopes of crashing populations of one dengue-transmitting species. Science writer Bijal Trivedi talks about recent tests of the bugs, and the concerns of critics.

NPR Story
10:00 am
Fri November 4, 2011

In Scott's Race To The Pole, Science Beat Speed

A hundred years ago, two teams were racing to the South Pole. The Norwegian team led by Roald Amundsen made it first, beating British explorer Robert Scott. But only Scott did pioneering science--and photography--along the way. Ira Flatow and guests discuss the achievements of the first Antarctic expeditions.

NPR Story
10:00 am
Fri November 4, 2011

Peering Into The Brain, But At What?

Originally published on Fri November 4, 2011 10:26 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, host: This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Your thoughts, your memories, as you know, all come from your brain cells, billions of them packed together in your head. My next guest would like to make a map of how all those cells connect to one another, talk to each other, learn new things, make new memories.

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