Talk of the Nation

Weekdays 12:00 pm

When Americans want to be a part of the national conversation, they turn to Talk of the Nation, NPR's live, midday news-talk program. Host Neal Conan leads a productive exchange of ideas and opinions on the issues that dominate the news landscape.

From breaking news, science, and education to religion and the arts, Talk of the Nation offers listeners the opportunity to join enlightening discussions with decision-makers, authors, academicians, and artists from around the world.

For two hours each Monday through Thursday, Talk of the Nation listeners weigh-in, share their thoughts and ask questions by calling, emailing, messaging through social media.

On Fridays the conversation turns to the topics of science, with Talk of the Nation: Science Friday with Ira Flatow, focusing on news and issues about the world of science and technology.

A long-time NPR journalist, Conan has been a reporter, editor, and anchor for NPR live events coverage. Conan played a major role in anchoring continuous live coverage of developments during the terrorist attacks and aftermath of September 11, 2001. His broadcasts are marked by their clarity, accuracy and eloquence.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a053e1c801268257cd85|5182a050e1c801268257cd81

Pages

Middle East
11:34 am
Mon June 4, 2012

President Obama's Unpalatable Options In Syria

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 1:01 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. The massacre in Hula late last month may have marked a turning point in Syria, but there appears to be no clear idea of what to do after Syria's ambassadors have been ordered home to Damascus.

Read more
Politics
11:30 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Wisconsin Recall: What's At Stake For Unions?

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 1:24 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Read more
Opinion
11:22 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Lessons Learned From The John Edwards Trial

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 1:04 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

After nine days of deliberations, a jury in North Carolina found John Edwards not guilty on one count of campaign finance fraud, and a federal judge declared a mistrial after they failed to reach a verdict on five more. Afterwards, the former presidential candidate said he'd committed no crimes but admitted to what he called awful wrongs for which he could only blame himself. Observers think it's highly unlikely the Justice Department will seek a retrial.

Read more
Health
10:42 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Remembering A Son In 'Immortal Bird'

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. For the rest of the hour, a look at an extraordinary life and a heartbreaking loss. In his new memoir "Immortal Bird," Doron Weber takes us to the inner circle of his family, where we meet his son Damon, a smart, likeable, aspiring actor born with a congenital heart defect. At 16, Damon undergoes a heart transplant, and his short life ends not long after in the ICU of a hospital that, according to Doron, seemed to botch his care in multiple and unimaginable ways.

Read more
Health Care
10:35 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Can Technology Deliver Better Health Care?

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. If you have trouble sleeping, your doctor might send you to a sleep lab and spend $3,000 a night to chart your sleep cycle, or you could do the same thing at home with a commercially available headband, which wirelessly transmits your sleep data to your smartphone for under 100 bucks.

Read more
Science
10:29 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Lightning Bug Of A Different Color

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

And now for our Video Pick of the Week. Flora's still here and positioned perfectly to take us on a safari.

FLORA LICHTMAN, BYLINE: We're still on safari.

FLATOW: We're still on safari.

LICHTMAN: The safari continues, this time to slightly larger organisms. See if you can see with your naked eye, and maybe in your own backyard. These guys are glow-in-the-dark - I have you already, don't I?

FLATOW: Yeah.

LICHTMAN: Millipedes - which, I didn't know - let me - can I tell you the story of how this came about?

Read more
NPR Story
9:39 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Paralyzed Rats Walk, Even Sprint After Rehab

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 10:18 am

Reporting in Science, researchers write that a combination of therapies, willpower and chocolate helped rats with severe spinal cord injuries learn to walk and even run again. Neurobiologist Moses Chao, not affiliated with the study, discusses the rehab method and whether it could work in humans.

NPR Story
9:39 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Why Ignorance Trumps Knowledge In Scientific Pursuit

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 10:22 am

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

People looking at the scientific world from the outside often see it as one dominated by facts, where scientists use a stepwise, systematic process that begins - you know, you learned all this stuff in grade school, a hypothesis, the collection of data, of observations, blah, blah, blah, you go through all these steps.

Read more
NPR Story
9:39 am
Fri June 1, 2012

The Many Lifestyles Of Muck-Dwelling Microbes

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 10:26 am

Scientists at the University of Leeds are exploring ways to use magnetic bacteria to build biocomputers of the future. Meanwhile, another group of researchers, reporting in Science, write that they have unearthed deep-sea microbe that live off nutrients from the dinosaur age.

Music Interviews
11:40 am
Thu May 31, 2012

Chely Wright: From Nashville Star To Outcast Activist

Chely Wright performs at the "Reading, Writing, Rhythm" show in Nashville, Tenn.
Tanya Braganti

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 8:54 am

As a child growing up in a small town in Kansas, Chely Wright would say a daily prayer: "Dear God, please don't let me be gay."

Read more

Pages