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A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

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Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

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Election 2012
2:00 am
Tue January 24, 2012

Fla. Tea Party Likes Gingrich's Bold Leadership Style

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As we've been reporting on the program this morning, Mitt Romney went on the attack at the GOP presidential debate in Florida last night. His target was rival Newt Gingrich, who was forced to defend his record as House speaker and later as a consultant to mortgage giant Freddie Mac. Gingrich denied charges of influence peddling that were leveled by Romney. And Gingrich said he was the type of bold, tough leader Washington needs.

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Movies
2:00 am
Tue January 24, 2012

Academy Award Nominations To Be Announced Tuesday

Originally published on Tue January 24, 2012 8:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Roll out the red carpet. We'll soon know the movies with a shot at Oscar gold. Nominations for the Academy Awards will be announced this morning in Beverly Hills. Kim Masters has been watching the Oscar race as editor-at-large for the Hollywood Reporter, and she joined us from NPR West. Good morning.

KIM MASTERS, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee.

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Election 2012
2:00 am
Tue January 24, 2012

Romney Campaign Finally Releases His Tax Returns

Originally published on Tue January 24, 2012 8:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, so Romney has gone on the attack in Florida, and he'll also be answering a lot of questions today about those taxes that he is releasing. As we heard from Mara, it turns out over the last few years, the effective tax rate Romney has paid is just under 15 percent.

Now, Newt Gingrich has been pressing Romney to publicly disclose the documents. And the former House speaker released his own tax returns, to dramatic effect, during a debate last Thursday.

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Election 2012
2:00 am
Tue January 24, 2012

Housing Woes Affect Florida's GOP Primary

One of the biggest issues in the Florida GOP primary race is housing. Mitt Romney is attacking Newt Gingrich's work for the housing giant Freddie Mac. This issue is not just a political talking point though. Three years after the economic collapse, foreclosures continue to affect real people every day in an extremely personal way.

Books
10:01 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

How Dr. Seuss Got His Start 'On Mulberry Street'

Courtesy Random House Children's Books

Seventy five years ago, before Theodor Geisel rocked the culinary world with green eggs and ham or put a red-and-white striped top hat on a talking cat, Geisel (who you probably know better as Dr. Seuss) was stuck on a boat, returning from a trip to Europe.

For eight days, he listened to the ship's engine chug away. The sound got stuck in his head and he started writing to the rhythm. Eventually, those rhythmic lines in his head turned into his first children's book: It was called And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street.

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The Picture Show
6:07 pm
Mon January 23, 2012

One Man's Quest To Capture America's Endangered Zoo Animals (With A Camera)

A spectacled owl (Pulsatrix perspicillata)
Joel Sartore National Geographic

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:06 am

To spend a day in the life of National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore, there are a few things you have to get used to. Really long drives, for one. Tigers charging at you. And, of course ... well ... messes.

"I'm the only studio portrait photographer I know whose subjects routinely poop and pee on the background right in front of me," he says from behind the lens.

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Books News & Features
9:00 am
Mon January 23, 2012

Publishers And Booksellers See A 'Predatory' Amazon

iStockphoto.com

Booksellers and publishers are worried that Amazon is going to devour their industry. The giant online retailer seems to have its hands in all aspects of the business, from publishing books to selling them — and that has some in the book world wondering if there is any end to Amazon's influence.

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Around the Nation
4:55 am
Mon January 23, 2012

Patriots Favored To Win Super Bowl By 3 Points

The New York Giants made the Super Bowl with a three-point win over San Francisco. The New England Patriots made the Super Bowl with a three-point win over Baltimore. Now Las Vegas oddsmakers are taking bets on the big game. The Patriots are favored to win by three.

Around the Nation
4:50 am
Mon January 23, 2012

Chicago Judge Illustrates His Rulings With Photos

Court opinions are usually not that exciting but a judge in Chicago is trying to liven up his rulings with illustrations. In one, he used an iconic photo of Bob Marley. The case was about a prisoner's right to keep his dreadlocks on religious grounds.

NPR Story
2:00 am
Mon January 23, 2012

India's Literary Festival Opens Amid Controversy

Tens of thousands of people are attending the Jaipur Literature Festival in India — including many international literary stars and Oprah Winfrey. Author Salman Rushdie was invited but decided not to attend after a warning that hit men would be after him. Rushdie wrote The Satanic Verses which has been banned in India for more than 20 years.

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