Morning Edition

Weekdays on News and Talk and News and Classical 5:00 a.m to 9:00 a.m

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Strange News
4:38 am
Fri July 17, 2015

A Siberian Town Throws A Party For Pests — And Masochists

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 4:55 am

When you have visitors you can't get rid, sometimes you just have to embrace them. That's the idea behind a festival on this week in the remote Siberian town of Berezniki, which is celebrating mosquitoes.

Revelers dress in mosquito costumes, vie to catch the most mosquitoes — and, perhaps oddest of all, hold a "most delicious girl" competition.

A panel of judges inspect contestants for who can get the most bites. The winner two years back had over 100.

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History
2:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Seven Decades Ago, A New, Enormous Kind Of Explosion

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 4:55 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
2:36 am
Fri July 17, 2015

'When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors' To Best Avoid Lightning's Pain

You don't have to be outdoors to be hurt or injured by a nearby lightning strike, like this one in New Mexico. The pain for survivors can be lifelong.
Marko Korosec Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 7:19 am

Lightning strikes have killed at least 20 people in the U.S. so far this year, according to the National Weather Service. That's higher than the average for recent years, the service says.

Most people who are injured or killed by lightning, it turns out, are not struck directly — instead, the bolt lands nearby.

That's what happened to Steve Marshburn in 1969. He was working inside a bank and says lightning somehow made its way through an ungrounded speaker at the drive-through window to the stool where he was sitting.

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Sports
2:09 am
Fri July 17, 2015

2-4-6-8, A 401(k) Would Be Great: Calif. Law Makes Cheerleaders Employees

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 4:55 am

Copyright 2015 Capital Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.capradio.org.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Religion
2:09 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Same-Sex Marriage Ruling Raises Questions Of Religious Rights, Tax Status

Originally published on Sun July 19, 2015 11:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Race
2:09 am
Fri July 17, 2015

Is Obama Finally Becoming The President African-Americans Wanted?

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 4:55 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
8:03 am
Thu July 16, 2015

The Fall Of A Dairy Darling: How Cottage Cheese Got Eclipsed By Yogurt

Cottage cheese peaked in the early 1970s, when the average American ate about 5 pounds of it per year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 10:52 am

As you know, here at The Salt we've been a little obsessed with yogurt lately.

But there's a flip side to the story of the yogurt boom. What about that other product made from fermented milk that had its boom from 1950 to 1975, and has been sliding into obscurity ever since?

Cottage cheese took off as a diet and health food in the 1950s.

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Parallels
5:41 am
Thu July 16, 2015

The View From Inside Syria

Saeed al-Batal, a Syrian photographer, posted this image from Douma, Syria, on his Facebook page on March 31.
Courtesy of Saeed al-Batal

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 12:46 pm

Syria's civil war has created the worst refugee crisis in the world, with more than 4 million people fleeing the country. Millions more have been displaced inside Syria, though we rarely hear from them.

Over the past year, NPR's Morning Edition has spoken three times with Saeed al-Batal, a photographer and filmmaker who doesn't use his real name for security reasons.

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The Two-Way
2:55 am
Thu July 16, 2015

'Buckyballs' Solve Century-Old Mystery About Interstellar Space

Harry Kroto, pictured in 1996, displays a model of the geodesic-shaped carbon molecules that he helped discover.
Michael Scates AP

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 8:03 am

Researchers in Switzerland say they've solved a nearly 100-year-old astronomical mystery by discovering what's in the wispy cloud of gas that floats in the space between the stars.

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Animals
2:55 am
Thu July 16, 2015

Stab It With A Dinglehopper! Seagull Goes After Eagle In Alaska

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 8:03 am

Seagulls don't get a lot of respect; they seem to be all screeching and scavenging for food. But at least one sea gull showed the guts of a hero recently.

Photographer David Canales caught what he called this "epic aerial battle" while kayaking in Alaska: A bald eagle, one seagull trapped in its talons, under ferocious assault from another gull.

Unfortunately, for all its fellow seagull's daring, the eagle's snack did not appear to escape.

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