Morning Edition

Weekdays on News and Talk and News and Classical 5:00 a.m to 9:00 a.m

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: OK, for more on the politics of the pipeline, we're going to talk now with NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley. He's on the line. Hi, Scott. SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good to be with you, Rachel. MARTIN: We just heard how some are criticizing the Obama administration for in some ways overreaching in this decision. Can you clarify how much do we know about what the White House involvement was? HORSLEY: Well,...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Protesters in North Dakota celebrated yesterday when the Army Corps of Engineers blocked - at least for now - a pipeline over the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Our next guest did not celebrate. North Dakota Republican Congressman Kevin Cramer spoke of a, quote, "lawless president" and vowed to fight on for the pipeline. He joins us now by phone. Congressman, welcome to the program. KEVIN CRAMER: Thanks for...

You can re-enact that scene in the old movie Christmas Vacation. A family goes into a forest and cuts down a ridiculously tall tree. The U.S. Forest Service is selling Christmas tree removal permits for $5 in the Green Mountain National Forest of Vermont. You go into the forest. You cut down the tree yourself. There's only one catch: the tree you choose cannot be more than 20 feet tall. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Good morning, I'm Steve...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. An old commercial features a cop who ends a story with the words, you can't make this stuff up. This may have occurred to sheriff's deputies in Maryland who responded to a disturbance at a dollar store. A customer was misbehaving - OK, not exactly a customer. Actually, a beaver had slipped inside to the holiday aisle of the store. The animal knocked over some decorations before...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with the story of the world's largest metaphor. A company in China is building a replica of the Titanic. It's a full-sized reproduction of the giant ocean liner that sank in 1912. Tourists can stay in faithfully reproduced first class cabins and eat in the dining hall like Leo DiCaprio in that movie. One difference - this Titanic will be permanently docked in a landlocked Chinese...

Pages