Earth Notes

Wednesdays at 7:30 a.m. and 5:32 p.m. and Saturdays at 9:34 a.m.
  • Hosted by Tristan Clum

The Colorado Plateau is one of North America’s human and environmental treasures. Ancient cultures have called this land of sun-baked deserts and lush mountain landscapes home for centuries. Earth Notes, KNAU’s weekly environmental series, explores the Plateau by telling stories of the intricate relationships between environmental issues and our daily lives.

Rooted in science and wrapped in human interest, the two minute long segments encourage listeners to think of themselves as part of the solution to environmental problems. Upbeat and informative, the program tries to foster hope and dampen despair about the environment, and motivate listeners to become more conscious and informed stewards of the Colorado Plateau.

Earth Notes: Spotted Bats

Feb 22, 2017
Bruce Taubert

In the animal world, spotted bats are standouts as endurance athletes. Weighing about as much as four chocolate kisses, these little flying mammals cover a lot of ground. 


George Andrejko, AGFD

If you’re by a desert spring in far northwest Arizona or southeast Nevada and hear a low chuckle followed by what sounds like fingers rubbing on a balloon, you may have stumbled upon a relict leopard frog.


Earth Notes: Vermilion Flycatchers

Feb 8, 2017
Dyer Lytle

In late February and early March, brilliant red and charcoal male vermilion flycatchers, like valentines on wings, arrive on their breeding grounds along Arizona’s rivers.  


Earth Notes: Controlling Kochia in the West

Feb 1, 2017
Scott Abella

In dry, disturbed soil throughout the West, a weedy invader from Eurasia has gained a tenacious foothold. Kochia scoparia, also called poor man’s alfalfa, has slender, gray-green leaves that turn an ornamental orange in autumn. Despite control efforts, this weed springs back relentlessly thanks to its bountiful seed bank.


U.S. Geological Survey Photographic Collection

Writer Wallace Stegner once claimed that exploration of the West by European-Americans began with Lewis and Clark and ended with Almon Thompson.


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