All Things Considered

Monday through Friday on News and Talk and News and Classical 3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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Asia
2:13 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

India Debates Re-Banning Homosexuality

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 2:44 pm

India's Supreme Court is now weighing arguments by opponents and proponents of legal homosexuality. Same-sex relationships were decriminalized in 2009, but a number of political, social and religious groups are fighting to reinstate a colonial-era law that punished homosexual acts with prison time. Public health workers say legal recognition of India's gay community is critical in the fight against HIV and AIDS.

Deceptive Cadence
1:42 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Garth Knox: One Viola And 1,000 Years Of Musical History

On Garth Knox's new album, Saltarello, the adventurous violist creates surprising musical juxtapositions.
Dániel Vass ECM Records

Originally published on Mon May 14, 2012 4:49 pm

Garth Knox was born to play the viola. As a youngster, he already had two sisters who played violin and a brother who played cello. "So for the family string quartet," Knox says, "it was very clear from the start which instrument I would play."

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The Record
1:05 pm
Mon May 14, 2012

Stax Bassist Duck Dunn Remembered In Memphis

Donald "Duck" Dunn onstage about 1990.
David Redfern Redferns/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:49 pm

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Movies
2:41 pm
Sun May 13, 2012

Johnny Carson: 'King Of Late Night,' A Man Unknown

The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson (1962 - 1992 NBC) c. 1970's
NBC/Photofest

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 3:52 pm

Fifty years ago, Johnny Carson became the host of The Tonight Show. During his 30 years as host, he reached a nightly audience of 15 million people and became one of the most trusted and famous men in America.

But Carson was intensely private off-screen, and very few people — including members of his own family--really knew him. Documentary filmmaker Peter Jones wanted to try and change that. Once a year, for 15 years, Jones sent Carson a letter, begging him for permission to make a documentary on his life.

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NPR Story
2:09 pm
Sun May 13, 2012

Opposition Wins Major State Vote In Germany

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 3:52 pm

Voters in Germany's most populous state, North Rhine Westphalia, have delivered a major blow to the ruling party, the Christian Democrats, led by Chancellor Angela Merkel. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz talks with Michael Kolz, the chief political reporter for German station Phoenix, about why the results in North Rhine Westphalia matter and what they mean for the left-wing Social Democrats.

NPR Story
2:09 pm
Sun May 13, 2012

Black Voters Weigh Obama, Support For Marriage Ban

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 3:52 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

And if you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

In North Carolina this past week, voters overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment defining marriage as the union between one man and one woman. A solid majority of the state's African-American voters backed it as well.

The very next day, President Obama publicly endorsed same-sex marriage. But will that affect black turnout in support of the president in November? Here's Tanner Latham from member station WFAE in Charlotte.

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Author Interviews
1:18 pm
Sun May 13, 2012

Lessons In Counterterrorism From The Octopus

iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 3:52 pm

In 2002, Rafe Sagarin was working in Washington, D.C., as a science adviser. It wasn't long after the Sept. 11 attacks, and Sagarin started paying attention to the security measures on Capitol Hill.

"I'd watch these other Capitol Hill staffers and I noticed that they'd just put their hand over the keys in their pockets so they didn't have to waste 30 seconds putting it on the conveyer belt though the security screening — and that didn't set off the alarm when they did that," Sagarin tells host of weekend All Things Considered Guy Raz.

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Why Music Matters
11:23 am
Sun May 13, 2012

Stop The Music: A Dancer Tries Silence

Amy O'Neal, a modern dance choreographer, recently took on the challenge of performing without music.
Gabriel Bienczycki Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 7:24 am

Weekends on All Things Considered continues its "Why Music Matters" series with stories of music fans, told in their own words. Today's story is about Amy O'Neal, a choreographer who took on the challenge of dancing in complete silence.

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History
2:23 pm
Sat May 12, 2012

How Teddy Saved Football

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 3:05 pm

Football is a violent game, but a century ago it used to be a lethal pastime. NPR's Tom Goldman explains how President Teddy Roosevelt stepped in and forced the establishment of new rules that made the game safer.

Author Interviews
2:23 pm
Sat May 12, 2012

The 12 Days Of Disaster That Made Modern Chicago

Originally published on Sat May 12, 2012 3:05 pm

In 1919, Chicago was called the "youngest great city in the world." World War I had just come to a close, troops were coming home, industry was booming and crime was down. Chicago's mayor at the time, William Hale Thompson — known as Big Bill — had just been re-elected and was spearheading an ambitious urban improvement program.

But in mid-July of 1919, just about everything that could go wrong in Chicago did. Among the headlines were a deadly dirigible crash, a bizarre kidnapping, race riots and a major public transit strike.

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