All Things Considered

Monday through Friday on News and Talk and News and Classical 3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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Music News
1:01 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

Coming Home: The Woody Guthrie Center Opens In Tulsa

Outside the Woody Guthrie Center, there's a large mural of Guthrie holding his guitar bearing the phrase, "This Machine Kills Fascists."
Brett Deering WireImage

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 5:43 am

Woody Guthrie's relationship with his home state has always been complicated. The singer-songwriter left Oklahoma and traveled the nation, composing some of the best-known songs of his time and ours. But to many in the state, his progressive political views did not fit with a strong conservative streak during the Cold War period. His reputation there is now closer to a full restoration as Oklahoma opens his archives.

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Pop Culture
12:31 pm
Tue May 28, 2013

What Happens To Spelling Bee Kids? Years Later, The Prize Is Perspective

Srinivas Ayyagari onstage in 1992 (left); at right, Ayyagari today. "Seeing someone from ESPN commenting on your style and strategy was bizarre and weird. But it's the closest I'll ever come to being an athlete," Ayyagari says.
Srinivas Ayyagari

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 5:45 am

For an academic contest pitting young spellers against the dictionary, the Scripps National Spelling Bee has taken on the intensity of the fiercest athletic events. Feeling the warmth of television lights — not to mention nerves and distractions — all while sports commentators are analyzing your "style" and approach is something only a select club of young word-nerdy Americans gets to experience. How does that early experience affect these mostly middle-school-aged kids later in life?

Lasting Memories

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Music Reviews
11:03 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Darius Rucker: Busted Hearts And Pickup Trucks

Darius Rucker's new album is titled True Believers.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 5:43 am

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Monkey See
7:15 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Summer Movie Preview: Kids, Theft, The Apocalypse, And Joss Whedon

Alexis Denisof and Amy Acker in Joss Whedon's Much Ado About Nothing.
Elsa Guillet-Chapuis Roadside Attractions

Trending, trending. M Night Shyamalan sees dead people. I see trends.

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Technology
1:57 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Vintage Sounds: The Clacks And Dings Of Pinball Machines

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We've asked you to send us stories about the vintage sounds of technology you miss, and we've been listening to those stories on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. Today, Scott Smith of Duncan, South Carolina, with the help of his own vintage sound collection, tells us about something he recalls first hearing when he was a small child.

SCOTT SMITH: I can remember I fell in love with the startup sound of an electromechanical pinball machine, oh, when I was 3 or 4 years old.

(SOUNDBITE OF A PINBALL MACHINE)

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Parallels
1:29 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

At 500, Machiavelli's 'Prince' Still Inspires Love And Fear

A portrait of Italian philosopher, writer and politician Niccolo Machiavelli (Florence, 1469-1527) by Antonio Maria Crespi. Half a millennium after he wrote The Prince, the slim volume continues to play an important role in political thought and evoke strong response.
Veneranda Biblioteca Ambrosiana De Agostini/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 2:52 pm

The name Niccolo Machiavelli is synonymous with political deceit, cynicism and the ruthless use of power. The Italian Renaissance writer called his most famous work, The Prince, a handbook for statesmen.

An exhibit underway in Rome celebrates the 500th anniversary of what is still considered one of the most influential political essays in Western literature.

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Food
1:28 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

Gathering Around The 'Global Grill'

Bon Appetit editor Adam Rapoport compiled recipes from all over the world for The Grilling Book. Pictured here are Chicken Yakitori.
Courtesy of Peden + Munk

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 2:36 pm

Grilling is a pillar of the American summer and the world's oldest form of cooking. From Latin America to Africa, grilling is at the heart of many cultures. This summer All Things Considered is setting out to explore some of them with the "Global Grill" series.

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Found Recipes
12:22 pm
Mon May 27, 2013

What's Your Favorite Taste Of Summer?

For NPR producer Melissa Gray, nothing says summer more than a cold glass of limeade.
booleansplit/via Flickr

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 3:01 pm

If your motivation plummets during summer's hot and sweaty days, a sweltering kitchen may be the last place on earth you want to be.

But despite the season, we still need to eat and drink. A good story and recipe can go a long way to raising your spirits and divert attention from how miserable you are.

All Things Considered wants to know which recipes give you that boost in the summer.

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Parallels
11:13 am
Mon May 27, 2013

'We Are Not Valued': Brazil's Domestic Workers Seek Rights

Cassia Mendes, who has worked as a housekeeper for more than 20 years, cleans a house in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Feb. 19, 2012. Brazil enacted on April 2 a constitutional amendment to grant domestic workers health insurance and other benefits.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 1:57 pm

The phone is ringing off the hook at the crowded waiting room at the Domestic Workers Union in downtown Sao Paulo, Brazil.

In the past decade, millions of Brazilians have joined the middle class. Advocates say this isn't just the result of a growing economy or social spending, but also laws like the one just passed that enshrine domestic workers' rights.

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Parallels
11:10 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Let Them Eat Grass: Paris Employs Sheep As Eco-Mowers

Sheep used to replace gas-guzzling lawn mowers graze at a truck warehouse at Evry, south of Paris.
Francois Mori AP

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 3:02 pm

City officials in Paris are experimenting with an unconventional way to keep urban lawns trimmed.

Agnes Masson used to be simply the director of the Paris city archives. Now, she's also a shepherdess of sorts, responsible for four black sheep munching the lush grass surrounding the gray archives building at the eastern edge of the city.

Masson says the ewes are efficient and easy to care for.

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