Scott Thybony

Canyon Country Commentator

Scott Thybony has traveled throughout North America on assignments for major magazines, including Smithsonian, Outside, and Men’s Journal.  An article  for National Geographic magazine was translated into a dozen languages, and his book, Canyon Country, sold hundreds of thousands of copies.  He once herded sheep for a Navajo family, having a hogan to call home and all the frybread he could eat.  His commentaries are heard regularly on Arizona Public Radio.

Scott Thybony

"Death by quicksand" has become a cliché in Hollywood Westerns set in Arizona. But in reality, it's practically unheard of. One of the state's only known quicksand deaths happened in 1872 in Paria Canyon. About 130 years later - in the exact same place - commentator Scott Thybony almost became Arizona's second quicksand fatality.

National Park Service

Hundreds of years ago, indigenous Puebloan women sculpted clay pots and used them to collect water. When commentator Scott Thybony found a potsherd near Wupatki National Monument, it transported him back in time and inspired this month's Canyon Commentary.

Scott Thybony

Commentator Scott Thybony is no stranger to grueling desert hikes. He's trudged up and down many canyons and mountains in the Southwest, including one that "wasn't really there". In his latest Canyon Commentary, Thybony explains his journey to Spirit Mountain in the Mojave Desert.

Scott Thybony

Writer Scott Thybony has come across many unusual and mysterious things on his treks in the remote regions of the Grand Canyon. In this month's commentary, his discovery of a name etched into a rock leads him to the story of a doomed, grim expedition in the Arctic more than 100 years ago.

Scott Thybony

Hull Cabin is the oldest remaining cabin in the Grand Canyon region of the Kaibab National Forest. It was built 125 years ago by brothers William and Philip Hull - early ranchers, prospectors and guiding entrepreneurs. It's near the remnants of another cabin which belonged to John Hance, the first resident of the South Rim. And as commentator Scott Thybony says, between the sublime views and the deep solitude, it's not hard to see why these early pioneers set up shop where they did.

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