Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan joined the KNAU staff as newscast manager in 2013. He’s covered a broad range of stories from local and state politics to environment, education and economic issues. He’s also covered wildfire in northern Arizona, including the 2014 Slide Fire that became the largest in the history of the Coconino National Forest. From time to time, Ryan interviews both internationally known and regional musicians, and he’s a regular contributor to NPR News and National Native News.

Before making the leap to public radio, Ryan spent a decade working in print media. As the editor of an alternative-weekly paper, he covered arts, entertainment and local culture and dabbled in political writing with a weekly column.

He earned his bachelor’s degree from Northern Arizona University in political science and journalism, and in the past has returned to teach at his alma mater.

Ryan is also a Flagstaff-based musician and has performed and recorded with many bands in the Southwest. He spends as much time as possible with his wife and daughter hiking and cycling the amazing terrain of northern Arizona.

Ways to Connect

File photo/AP

A new report estimates the state will end this fiscal year with a balance of more than half-a-billion-dollars. It follows the announcement of Governor Doug Ducey’s 2017 budget proposal, which doesn’t include last year’s steep cuts to higher education and other state services. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald

The Environmental Protection Agency has released a preliminary report about the fate of metals contained in the waste spilled last summer from Colorado’s Gold King Mine. The agency says most of metals came to rest in the bed of the Animas River. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Rick Johnson Photography

Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye wants referees who officiate high school sporting events in northern Arizona to take cultural sensitivity training. That’s because this week Navajo female basketball players on the Flagstaff High School team were told to change a traditional hairstyle before a game. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Mark Henle/The Arizona Republic

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says they do not know why two Mexican gray wolves died after being tranquilized and captured by the agency’s biologists. The deaths happened during the annual population survey of the endangered animals in eastern Arizona and New Mexico. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


fox5sandiego.com

The Navajo Nation Council has approved the largest spending package in its history. It’ll be funded by a settlement the tribe received from a federal lawsuit, and benefit several water and sanitation projects. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Navajo Nation

Last week, leaders from nearly two dozen Arizona tribes gathered at the state capital for the annual Indian Nations and Tribes Legislative Day. Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye told state House representatives that he feels tribal sovereignty is threatened. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


grandcanyon.com

A recent poll showed a majority of Arizonans support the possible designation of a national monument outside Grand Canyon National Park. But a group of current and former state wildlife officials have voiced their opposition to the idea. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


Michael Chow/The Republic

Four endangered Mexican gray wolves were found dead last December in Arizona and New Mexico. It’s the first time in three months that wildlife officials have reported deaths in the population that makes up the Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

Navajo Times/Leigh T. Jimmie

Many Navajo veterans have limited access to federal and state health benefits, especially those who live in remote areas. A new bill under consideration by the Navajo Nation Council is designed to make the Navajo Veterans Administration more responsive to veterans’ needs. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

Federal officials have proposed a sweeping new plan to manage Glen Canyon Dam for the next two decades. They want to be more proactive in their efforts to restore fish and animal habitat as well as beaches that have degraded in the Grand Canyon since the dam became operational in the 1960s. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


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