Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan joined KNAU's newsroom staff in 2013. He covers a broad range of stories from local, state and tribal politics to education, economy and public lands issues. Ryan also regularly interviews both internationally known and regional musicians, and is a frequent contributor to NPR News and National Native News.

Before making the leap to public radio, Ryan spent more than a decade in print media. As the longtime editor of an alternative weekly paper, he covered arts and culture and wrote about a broad range of topics in a weekly column. 

He earned his bachelor’s degree from Northern Arizona University in political science and journalism, and has returned to teach at his alma mater. 

Ryan is also a Flagstaff-based musician and has performed and recorded with many bands in the Southwest. He spends as much time as possible with his wife and daughter hiking and cycling the amazing terrain of northern Arizona.

Ways to Connect

USFS

Forest Service fire managers report significant progress fighting the 6,634-acre Highline Fire north of Payson. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it’s now 76 percent contained and all evacuation orders have been lifted. 


Kirk Siegler/NPR

Federal water managers last month predicted rising levels in Lake Mead after an especially wet winter in the West. But they changed those forecasts this week, and now say the lake will fall much lower in the coming year. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


onnsfa.org

Federal legislation that would expand Amber Alerts on tribal lands has passed its final hurdle before it receives a vote in the full U.S. Senate. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Ryan Rawlinson/USFS

The lightning-caused Boundary Fire is burning on nearly 5,400 acres northwest of Flagstaff and is only 5 percent contained. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, high winds and heavy smoke have caused a section of U.S. Highway 180 between Grand Canyon and Flagstaff to remain closed.


tripadvisor.com

The Navajo Nation and Hopi Tribe have fought in court for nearly four decades over water rights to the Little Colorado River. The tribes recently brought in a mediator after renewed negotiations reached an impasse. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


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