Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan joined KNAU's newsroom staff in 2013. He covers a broad range of stories from local, state and tribal politics to education, economy and public lands issues. Ryan also regularly interviews both internationally known and regional musicians, and is a frequent contributor to NPR News and National Native News.

Before making the leap to public radio, Ryan spent more than a decade in print media. As the longtime editor of an alternative weekly paper, he covered arts and culture and wrote about a broad range of topics in a weekly column. 

He earned his bachelor’s degree from Northern Arizona University in political science and journalism, and has returned to teach at his alma mater. 

Ryan is also a Flagstaff-based musician and has performed and recorded with many bands in the Southwest. He spends as much time as possible with his wife and daughter hiking and cycling the amazing terrain of northern Arizona.

Ways to Connect

attn.com

The U.S. Department of the Interior is streamlining a program that consolidates privately owned tribal land with multiple owners. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the process called fractionation prevents home building and business creation on millions of acres. 


NPS

Officials at Grand Canyon National Park are proposing updates to an aging water pipeline. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the rim-to-rim system supplies water to the entire park. 


Courtesy

The Coconino County Board of Supervisors has passed a resolution in support of the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. It follows an executive order by President Trump to review more than two dozen monument designations throughout the country. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Katherine Hurrelbrinck

This is the first installment of a new occasional segment we like to call Beats and Beets: stories about food and music. The Flagstaff band Enormodome kicks it off. They’re a two-man band like no two-man band you’ve ever heard before. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius brings us this profile.


Andrew Hamik/AP

A bipartisan group of U.S. Senators recently reintroduced a bill aimed at preventing the illegal sale of Native American cultural items. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it follows years of high-profile auctions in Paris. 


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