Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan joined the KNAU staff as newscast manager in 2013. He’s covered a broad range of stories from local and state politics to environment, education and economic issues. He’s also covered wildfire in northern Arizona, including the 2014 Slide Fire that became the largest in the history of the Coconino National Forest. From time to time, Ryan interviews both internationally known and regional musicians, and he’s a regular contributor to NPR News and National Native News.

Before making the leap to public radio, Ryan spent a decade working in print media. As the editor of an alternative-weekly paper, he covered arts, entertainment and local culture and dabbled in political writing with a weekly column.

He earned his bachelor’s degree from Northern Arizona University in political science and journalism, and in the past has returned to teach at his alma mater.

Ryan is also a Flagstaff-based musician and has performed and recorded with many bands in the Southwest. He spends as much time as possible with his wife and daughter hiking and cycling the amazing terrain of northern Arizona.

Ways to Connect

Coconino National Forest

The U.S. Department of the Interior will allocate nearly $95 million to a federal land conservation fund. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, Arizona will receive about $2 million through the program. 


Sam A. Minkler/The Guardian

The largest coal company in the U.S., Peabody Energy, announced Wednesday that it’s filed for bankruptcy. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, Peabody has operated on the Navajo Nation since the 1960s.


Mark Henle/The Arizona Republic

The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality is developing new air pollution permits for three uranium mines near the Grand Canyon. The agency halted the permit renewals last year after elevated levels of uranium were detected near one of the mines. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


norcalblogs.com

The Navajo Nation and Hopi Tribe have been at odds for almost four decades about water rights to the Little Colorado River. Leaders of the tribes recently met with Arizona officials to revive attempts at a settlement. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye is calling on the U-S Senate to quickly fill the open seat on the U-S Supreme Court. He says further delays to consider President Obama’s nominee, Merrick Garland, would harm American Indian tribes. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


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