Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan joined KNAU's newsroom staff in 2013. He covers a broad range of stories from local, state and tribal politics to education, economy and public lands issues. Ryan also regularly interviews both internationally known and regional musicians, and is a frequent contributor to NPR News and National Native News.

Before making the leap to public radio, Ryan spent more than a decade in print media. As the longtime editor of an alternative weekly paper, he covered arts and culture and wrote about a broad range of topics in a weekly column. 

He earned his bachelor’s degree from Northern Arizona University in political science and journalism, and has returned to teach at his alma mater. 

Ryan is also a Flagstaff-based musician and has performed and recorded with many bands in the Southwest. He spends as much time as possible with his wife and daughter hiking and cycling the amazing terrain of northern Arizona.

Ways to Connect

Coconino County Sheriff's Office

Coconino County officials have identified the man who allegedly started an 85-acre wildfire yesterday in Winona east of Flagstaff. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it destroyed several structures including at least one home.


nau.edu

The City of Flagstaff is partnering with the Hopi Tribe on a large-scale renewable energy project. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it’s designed to provide tribal revenue and help the city achieve its goal of going completely green.


Ryan Heinsius

Nearly 9,500 acres of Coconino National Forest near Flagstaff will no longer be included in a potential land swap with the state and Hopi Tribe. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the announcement came Monday night at a meeting in Flagstaff City Council Chambers. 


Josemaria Toscano/Deseret News

Mining industry groups last week asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a ban on new uranium mining claims near the Grand Canyon. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the Obama-era order was designed to protect the watershed on more than a million acres.


Courtesy

The U.S. House of Representatives Monday passed a bill to expand Amber Alerts on tribal lands. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, many reservations lack the infrastructure to send emergency notifications in cases of missing or abducted children.


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