Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan joined KNAU's newsroom staff in 2013. He covers a broad range of stories from local, state and tribal politics to education, economy and public lands issues. Ryan also regularly interviews both internationally known and regional musicians, and is a frequent contributor to NPR News and National Native News.

Before making the leap to public radio, Ryan spent more than a decade in print media. As the longtime editor of an alternative weekly paper, he covered arts and culture and wrote about a broad range of topics in a weekly column. 

He earned his bachelor’s degree from Northern Arizona University in political science and journalism, and has returned to teach at his alma mater. 

Ryan is also a Flagstaff-based musician and has performed and recorded with many bands in the Southwest. He spends as much time as possible with his wife and daughter hiking and cycling the amazing terrain of northern Arizona.

Ways to Connect

tripadvisor.com

The Navajo Nation and Hopi Tribe have fought in court for nearly four decades over water rights to the Little Colorado River. The tribes recently brought in a mediator after renewed negotiations reached an impasse. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


Robin Silver

The Mohave County Board of Supervisors is calling for the repeal of a ban on new uranium mining near the Grand Canyon. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the Havasupai Tribe has condemned the board’s actions.


Bob Wick/BLM California

The Mohave County Board of Supervisors has drafted letters to the U.S. Interior Secretary urging the abolishment of national monument designations in Arizona, and end a uranium mining moratorium near the Grand Canyon. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


There was a surge in the number of abandoned campfires over the holiday weekend, according to National Forest officials. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Coconino National Forest

Coconino National Forest officials have closed an area west of Lake Mary Road as they allow a lightning-caused wildfire to continue to burn. Officials say they want the 600-acre Snake Ridge Fire to grow much larger to remove dead wood and other fuel to reduce the risk of severe wildfire.

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