Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan joined KNAU's newsroom staff in 2013. He covers a broad range of stories from local, state and tribal politics to education, economy and public lands issues. Ryan also regularly interviews both internationally known and regional musicians, and is a frequent contributor to NPR News and National Native News.

Before making the leap to public radio, Ryan spent more than a decade in print media. As the longtime editor of an alternative weekly paper, he covered arts and culture and wrote about a broad range of topics in a weekly column. 

He earned his bachelor’s degree from Northern Arizona University in political science and journalism, and has returned to teach at his alma mater. 

Ryan is also a Flagstaff-based musician and has performed and recorded with many bands in the Southwest. He spends as much time as possible with his wife and daughter hiking and cycling the amazing terrain of northern Arizona.

Ways to Connect

U.S. EPA

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has awarded a contract to assess abandoned uranium mines on and near the Navajo Nation. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it’ll include 30 mine sites. 


Michael Chow/The Arizona Republic

State wildlife managers have released a study highlighting the historical range of endangered Mexican gray wolves. It contends the animal’s territory was almost entirely in Mexico, but as KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, some conservation groups are skeptical of the findings. 


Janice and Nolan Braud/Alamy/High Country News

Sunday is the deadline for potential buyers of the Navajo Generating Station to show interest in the plant. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, without new ownership NGS will close at the end of 2019.


Ryan Heinsius

The Coconino County Board of Supervisors this week passed a resolution urging Congressional immigration reform. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the board’s main focus is preserving the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.


Ryan Heinsius

The Salt River Project is continuing a forest-thinning initiative at several sites throughout northern Arizona. Company representatives and officials say it’s crucial for watershed health and to prevent catastrophic wildfires. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


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