Peter O'Dowd

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11:01 am
Wed August 29, 2012

Arizona Congressional Candidate Questions Presence Of Middle Easterners

A video of a Republican congressional candidate in Southern Arizona is causing a stir on Election Day. The controversy stems from comments she made about people of Middle Eastern descent.

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Fronteras
2:29 pm
Mon August 13, 2012

Forecast For Phoenix: Hotter And Hotter

John Larsala struggles to keep his family cool during the Phoenix summer. The shade trees in his front yard have died because he cannot afford to water them.
Peter O'Dowd

A place with one of the harshest climates in the Southwest –- Phoenix -- records more days over 100 degrees than any other major city in the country. But climate models predict metro Phoenix, with its population of four million, will get hotter.

Here in John Larsala’s driveway, the view is bleak.

“You see our tree is dead,” Larsala said. “All these trees are dying because I can’t put water on it.”

The grass is dead too. In fact, there is no grass anymore.

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Fronteras
9:40 am
Fri June 29, 2012

Americans Watch Mexico Closely On Election Day

John Wood, a Texas businessman, stands at the edge of an unfinished rail bridge that will link Brownsville, Tex., with Mexico. He's closely watching the Mexican presidential election.
Peter O'Dowd

Standing on the edge of an unfinished railroad bridge outside of Brownsville, Texas, businessman John Wood can see across the Rio Grande into Mexico.

"We are tied together," Wood said of the two countries. "It's kind of like an umbilical cord."

The rail line will connect Brownsville with Matamoros, Mexico, when completed. It's the first of its kind to connect the countries in a century.

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Fronteras
4:00 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

The Impact Of A Mixed SB 1070 Ruling On Arizona

The United States Supreme Court ruled Monday on Arizona’s immigration law, known as SB 1070. It was a mixed ruling. The court struck down most of the law, but upheld the most controversial provision.

The state of Arizona has already spent nearly $3 million defending the law. And the investment was worth it, according to state leaders like Governor Jan Brewer. She called the court’s ruling a victory for states like Arizona struggling with illegal immigration.

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Fronteras
12:24 pm
Fri June 15, 2012

Immigration Expert Urges Caution in Light of Immigration Changes

An immigration expert says young people who were illegally brought to the United States by their parents should be still be cautious, despite President Obama’s announcement today that they’ll be spared  from deportation.

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Fronteras
5:20 pm
Tue June 5, 2012

Trade Between U.S., Mexico Tops $500 Billion

This new rail bridge under construction linking Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico is a symbol of the growing trade relations between the two countries.
Peter O'Dowd KJZZ

Trade between the United States and Mexico reached half a trillion dollars in 2011. Cross-border commerce is growing despite escalating drug violence in Mexico.

The final tally came out to $500 billion in goods and services traded between the two countries, according to a paper by the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars and Arizona State University's North American Center for Transborder Studies.

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KNAU and Arizona News
4:00 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Phoenix Housing Market Undeniably Up

Ken Peterson is a vice president for Shea Homes, where sales are up almost 60 percent from last year.
Peter O'Dowd KJZZ

Here's a turnaround worth noting: The housing market in Phoenix is emerging from a historic slumber. Foreclosures are down, and new home sales are re-energizing the market -- up 35 percent from a year ago.

Let's get down to street level, shall we? How 'bout Ravenswood Drive near Gilbert's eastern edge.

Ken Peterson is a Vice President for Shea Homes. We're in a development called Spaces. And listen to this, air compressors and nail guns all around us.

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Fronteras
4:00 pm
Mon April 23, 2012

After SB 1070, Some Migrants In Arizona Self-Deport

Alison Gamez says she will leave Arizona because of the state's immigration laws. Her husband came to the country illegally, but he has since received permission to work in the US.
Peter O'Dowd KJZZ

 A federal judge stopped the most controversial parts of Arizona's 2010 immigration law from going into effect. But supporters say that hasn't prevented the law from achieving one of its stated goals: Thousands of people who were living in Arizona illegally have left.

Jossie is one of them.

"A lot of time when the police was driving behind me, start shaking my body, stop breathing," says the mother of two teenagers, who now lives in Albuquerque, N.M.

Jossie is still afraid of getting deported, so we agreed not to use her last name.

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Around the Nation
3:03 am
Sun April 22, 2012

Arizona's Illegal Workforce Is Down, So Now What?

Undocumented immigrants are searched before boarding a deportation flight in Mesa, Ariz., last June. Since the passage of the state's immigration law two years ago, thousands of illegal workers have left.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 2:41 pm

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments next week on the most divisive immigration law in recent memory. Arizona's Legislature passed SB 1070 two years ago, but much of it has been put on hold pending the court's decision.

Still, supporters say the law has achieved one of its stated goals: Thousands of illegal immigrants have self-deported, leaving the state on their own. The real reason — and consequence — of such a demographic shift may be more complex, however.

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Election 2012
2:18 pm
Thu February 16, 2012

In Arizona, Romney Can't Take Mormons For Granted

Karen Johnson, from Linden, Ariz., supports the candidacy of Ron Paul. She says Mitt Romney shares her faith, but not her politics.
Peter O'Dowd For NPR

Originally published on Thu February 16, 2012 4:41 pm

The wind howls on a blustery Sunday morning in the White Mountains of eastern Arizona, as well-dressed families pull into the parking lot of a Mormon church.

Mormon pioneer roots run more than a century deep in this part of the state, an isolated spot between two Indian reservations.

Karen Johnson is among the Mormon faithful, passionate about God and country.

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