Peter O'Dowd

A video of a Republican congressional candidate in Southern Arizona is causing a stir on Election Day. The controversy stems from comments she made about people of Middle Eastern descent.

Peter O'Dowd

A place with one of the harshest climates in the Southwest –- Phoenix -- records more days over 100 degrees than any other major city in the country. But climate models predict metro Phoenix, with its population of four million, will get hotter.

Here in John Larsala’s driveway, the view is bleak.

“You see our tree is dead,” Larsala said. “All these trees are dying because I can’t put water on it.”

The grass is dead too. In fact, there is no grass anymore.

Peter O'Dowd

Standing on the edge of an unfinished railroad bridge outside of Brownsville, Texas, businessman John Wood can see across the Rio Grande into Mexico.

"We are tied together," Wood said of the two countries. "It's kind of like an umbilical cord."

The rail line will connect Brownsville with Matamoros, Mexico, when completed. It's the first of its kind to connect the countries in a century.

The United States Supreme Court ruled Monday on Arizona’s immigration law, known as SB 1070. It was a mixed ruling. The court struck down most of the law, but upheld the most controversial provision.

The state of Arizona has already spent nearly $3 million defending the law. And the investment was worth it, according to state leaders like Governor Jan Brewer. She called the court’s ruling a victory for states like Arizona struggling with illegal immigration.

An immigration expert says young people who were illegally brought to the United States by their parents should be still be cautious, despite President Obama’s announcement today that they’ll be spared  from deportation.

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