NPR Staff

This story is part of NPR's podcast Embedded, which digs deep into the stories behind the news.

Sitting on a dresser in the back bedroom of a house in Austin, Ind., is the bottom of a soda can. A woman places a sliver of a pill, a powerful prescription opioid called Opana, on the jagged half-can. She begins to heat the pill with a cigarette lighter, melting its hard white coating and turning it the color of whiskey.

Her name is Joy.

Detroit singer Mike Posner's latest hit on the pop charts is — ironically — about the down sides of having a hit on the pop charts. It's called "I Took a Pill in Ibiza."

The politics team is back with a quick take to discuss the results of the Indiana primary. And although it's usually the primary winner who makes the headlines, this time around it was the loser. After losing Indiana, Sen. Ted Cruz suspended his campaign, clearing the way for Donald Trump to get the Republican nomination.

Also on the podcast, why Hillary Clinton is still the likely Democratic nominee even though she didn't win the Indiana primary.

On the podcast:

Catch up with these interviews from NPR's Indiana primary night special coverage, hosted by Scott Detrow.

Randy Gentry, Vigo County GOP chair and Trump supporter

On a recent shift in Indiana for Trump

NBC's reality show The Biggest Loser turns dieting into a grueling training regime fit for gladiators. The victor this past season was Roberto Hernandez. He dropped a whopping 160 pounds to reach a body weight of 188 pounds.

Intel was once known for its success in branding personal computers with microprocessors, a technology that fueled the digital revolution. But the Silicon Valley veteran announced last month it would lay off 11 percent of its workforce — up to 12,000 positions — and that it's shifting away from personal computing.

Immigration is back on the front burner in the Republican primary.

This past week, at a rally in Orange County, Calif., Donald Trump returned to talking about the wall he wants to build along the U.S. border with Mexico.

Meanwhile, outside, there were protesters speaking out against his immigration proposals and carrying Mexican flags.

Last week, NPR published a special report on suicide in Native Arctic communities. Reporter Rebecca Hersher spent 10 weeks in Greenland, the Arctic country with the highest known suicide rate in the world: 82.8 suicides per 100,000 people each year — six times higher than the U.S. suicide rate. She interviewed Inuit people in the Greenlandic capital, Nuuk, and in small towns on the country's remote east coast. She spoke with community leaders and mental health professionals who are trying to prevent suicide and come to terms with its underlying causes.

One photo of a pensive Congolese woman in her distinctive makeup could be mistaken for a Renaissance painting. Another, of a coal plant sending smoke plumes over a town in China, looks like a still from a 1950s propaganda film. And another, of a little girl yawning during an Indonesian festival, will just make you smile.

This week, the NPR Politics team discusses the big batch of primary states that voted on Tuesday, why Sanders won't run as an independent, and Donald Trump's comment about Clinton using the "woman card."

The team also answers listener mail and listens to a bit of Carly Fiorina's (Ted Cruz's new vice presidential pick) campaign trail song.

On the podcast:

  • White House Correspondent Tamara Keith
  • Campaign Reporter Sam Sanders

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