Michel Marizco

Reporter, Fronteras

Senior Field Correspondent Michel Marizco (Tucson) has reported along the Southwest border for the past decade, most of that in Arizona and Sonora. Before joining the Fronteras Desk, he produced stories in the field for CNN Madrid, the BBC, 60 Minutes Australia, and the CBC. His work now focuses on transnational trafficking syndicates, immigration, federal law enforcement and those weird, wild stories that make the U.S.-Mexico border such an inherently fascinating region. He is a contributing author on Shared Responsibility: U.S.-Mexico Policy Options for Confronting Organized Crime and an occasional writer at High Country News. In his spare time, he works with Investigative Reporters and Editors and the Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, assisting in the ongoing investigations of journalist killings in Mexico.

In the latest in our series Broken Border, Immigration Reform in the Southwest, Fronteras reporter Michel Marizco looks at what border security means and whether the U.S. has reached its goal.

The State Department has renewed its travel warning for Mexico, saying that drug violence there can be a danger to Americans.

The race for an important border Congressional District in Arizona has fallen to a difference of little more than 400 votes as the tallying of the final numbers continues. A final count could still be days away.

The Mexican military arrested two suspects in the murder of Border Patrol agent Nicholas Ivie.

Reuters news is reporting that the Mexican Army arrested two people Wednesday morning in Agua Prieta, Sonora. The border town lies about 15 miles southeast of where the murder took place.

An FBI spokeswoman in Phoenix said she cannot confirm the arrests.

The United States will begin accepting applications tomorrow for qualifying illegal immigrants to be granted a two year reprieve from deportation.

The United States Supreme Court ruled Monday on Arizona’s immigration law, known as SB 1070. It was a mixed ruling. The court struck down most of the law, but upheld the most controversial provision.

The state of Arizona has already spent nearly $3 million defending the law. And the investment was worth it, according to state leaders like Governor Jan Brewer. She called the court’s ruling a victory for states like Arizona struggling with illegal immigration.

The Supreme Court’s decision overturning key parts of SB 1070 was no surprise to some Arizona border residents. But they have a question, and it's a sticking point: What is the U.S. going to do about border enforcement in their backyards?

Will Seberger / ZUMA (pool)

Democrat Ron Barber won the special election Tuesday. He’ll serve out former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords’ remaining six month term after she was forced to retire following last year's assassination attempt. 

Last night, Barber took the stage amid cheers and shouts.

He promised to support veterans, military families and the middle class.

But with former Representative Gabby Giffords standing beside him, he also took the opportunity to criticize the vitriol funded by super PACs during the race.

For years, the United States has issued travel warnings for visitors to Mexico, but now a group of lawmakers want one issued for southern Arizona. That has officials along the Arizona border upset. They say a state travel warning will scare tourists away.

The Tucson Unified School District voted four-to-one to end its Mexican American Studies Program late Tuesday night. The school district risked losing $15 million if it continued teaching ethnic studies as they were being taught. From Tucson, Michel Marizco reports.

It’s the final blow against the program. Using a new state law, Arizona school officials outlawed Mexican American studies at TUSD. They said the courses were divisive and advocated overthrowing the government. Then the teachers appealed to a federal judge to stop Arizona from ending the courses.