Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

NASA

NASA satellite imagery shows a more detailed picture of how drought has shrunk water levels and exposed the bottom of the Colorado River in the lower Grand Canyon.


Tom Brown, USFS Coconino National Forest

The U.S. Forest Service allowed fire to burn more than 73,500 acres in northern Arizona last year. New research examines how well these “managed wildfires” restore healthy, historic conditions to ponderosa pine forests.  


Donald Bills, USGS

A new study from the U.S. Geological Survey shows uranium in Pigeon Spring, north of the Grand Canyon, is likely not related to a nearby mine. The research is part of a larger effort to understand the impacts of uranium mining in the region.


Steve Hillebrand, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A disease fatal to deer and elk has struck herds in some western states. But Chronic Wasting Disease hasn’t yet arrived in Arizona, according to the Arizona Game and Fish Department.


Jackie Banks, US Forest Service SW Region, Kaibab National Forest

Scientists want the public’s help to document the biodiversity of the Kaibab National Forest. From the Arizona Science Desk, Melissa Sevigny reports on a new citizen science project.

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