Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

Ways to Connect

NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The Cassini spacecraft mission ends tomorrow after two decades in space. A Flagstaff scientist on the mission team says Cassini transformed our knowledge of Saturn and especially its strange moon Titan. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with Randy Kirk of the U.S. Geological Survey from Pasadena, California, where the team has gathered to witness the spacecraft’s final moments.


NAU

Hurricane Harvey is expected to be one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history. Researchers at Northern Arizona University specialize in mapping how local climate events affect the national economy. They say Harvey’s influence on food and fuel prices could be felt for months. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with lead researcher Ben Ruddell.

BLM

Arizona leads the nation this year in illegal drone flights over wildfires.  These “drone incursions” force firefighters to ground aircraft bearing water and fire retardant. That delays critical firefighting and puts lives at risk. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

Melissa Sevigny

Today’s full solar eclipse was the first in 100 years to stretch from coast to coast in the U.S. Millions of people flocked to the 70-mile-wide path of totality, and one of them is KNAU’s science reporter Melissa Sevigny. She’s on the line with me from Madras, Ore., which was in the center of the path of totality.


NPS/Erin Whittaker

Every state in America will witness at least a partial solar eclipse today. In Arizona the celestial show starts at about 9:15 this morning and ends at noon. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Pages