Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

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Melissa Sevigny

Arizona’s Verde River has a lot of competing uses: city dwellers, farmers, kayakers and environmentalists all want its water in different ways. But a new project aims to unite everyone over a glass of beer. A farm in Camp Verde has planted a crop of malt barley, to conserve water and give Arizona breweries a key ingredient to craft a truly local beer. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports. 

Melissa Sevigny

How much would you pay to restore the forest around you? A new economic study says the better your view, the tighter your purse strings. Researchers at Northern Arizona University surveyed Flagstaff residents and discovered people who can see the San Francisco Peaks from their house are less willing to pay for forest restoration projects meant to protect the town from catastrophic wildfires. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with the study’s lead author, Julie Mueller.


NASA/JPL-Caltech

Arizona astronomers are building a spacecraft the size and shape of a shoebox to learn more about potentially habitable planets beyond our solar system. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Rob Gay

When President Trump shrank the size of two national monuments in Utah, it left many hundreds of scientifically valuable fossil sites outside the new boundaries. Paleontologists are worried about their fate. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


George Andrejko, AZGFD

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says a fish native to the Colorado River is no longer in immediate danger of extinction. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports the humpback chub will be reclassified as “threatened” instead of “endangered.”


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