Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

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Jason Burton/NPS

This year the nation marks the 50th anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. The law now protects almost 13,000 miles of the most remote and pristine waterways in the U.S.  

 

Melissa Sevigny

Starting today, City of Flagstaff residents can no longer recycle all types of plastic. Only rigid bottles and jugs will be accepted. The new policy has to do with changing recycling rules in China, where Flagstaff’s plastic ends up. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with the City of Flagstaff’s waste director Todd Hanson.


Center for Biological Diversity

The Bureau of Land Management will offer leases on forty-two hundred acres of public land near the Little Colorado River for oil and gas development. The decision comes after a federal ruling loosened the requirements for environmental review. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Melissa Sevigny

An association of British science teachers sent a letter of rebuke to the Arizona Department of Education for its controversial attitude toward evolution. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Rose Houk

The ancestors of northern Arizona's elk were brought here from Wyoming more than a century ago. This spring, a group of those elk took another journey, to West Virginia.


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