Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

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USGS

This weekend, managers at Glen Canyon Dam will begin a first-of-its-kind experiment to release water that benefits bugs, which play a vital role in the Colorado River ecosystem. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Ryan Heinsius

Several hundred people marched to the Flagstaff City Hall today on the first day of a statewide teacher’s strike in support of higher teacher wages and school funding. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Ryan Heinsius

Tens of thousands of educators are poised for a statewide walk out tomorrow demanding more funding for K–12 schools and better wages for teachers and support staff. Communities are mobilizing to provide day care for the very students those teachers are fighting for. Non-profits, churches and other organizations are taking in kids for little or no charge during what will be the first educator strike in state history. The KNAU news team went out into the community to hear from some of those who’ve offered to care for students, and support teachers, while they go to bat.


National Park Service

Scientists have made the first-ever map of how tamarisk beetles have spread into the Grand Canyon from other states. The leaf-eating beetles were introduced to control the invasive trees. But as KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, they weren’t supposed to survive as far south as Arizona.

Ryan Heinsius

Flagstaff residents and visitors can now use a smartphone app to borrow a bright orange bicycle. The six-month pilot program is run by a company called Spin, in partnership with the City of Flagstaff and Northern Arizona University. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

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