Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

Salt River Project

The Navajo Generating Station near Page is slated to close in 2019. That raises questions about what might happen to the water the plant currently draws from the Colorado River. Arizona Public Radio’s Melissa Sevigny reports. 


Melissa Sevigny

Some doctors are operating on hands in a new way: with the patient wide awake. It eliminates the risks and side effects of general anesthesia. But the technique has been slow to catch on in the United States because of a decades-old myth about the dangers of injecting adrenaline into hands. From the Arizona Science Desk, Melissa Sevigny reports on how that’s starting to change.


Melissa Sevigny

Snowflake is a small town in eastern Arizona. It’s got more deer and elk than people, and that can make it dangerous to navigate rural roads at night. That’s why students at Snowflake Junior High invented a system of flashing lights to warn drivers when a big animal is nearby. It’s an idea that will take them all the way to a national competition in New York.


Melissa Sevigny

The Navajo Nation is arid and vast—nearly thirty thousand square miles. Hydrologists struggle to collect much-needed measurements of rainfall there. But now they have help from NASA satellites.


Molly Baker

A decade ago Flagstaff suffered a blow when Pluto was “demoted” to a dwarf planet. It was discovered at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff in 1930 and is a source of pride for the city. But astronomers voted on the definition of a planet and Pluto didn’t make the cut. Now, planetary scientists say that definition is both overly complicated and incomplete.  They’ve suggested a different one. Melissa Sevigny from the Arizona Science Desk spoke with two Lowell scientists about the definition, Will Grundy and Gerard van Belle.   


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