Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

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Melissa Sevigny

The Trump Administration has imposed a tariff on imported solar panel components. It’s meant to protect American businesses, but experts say it could hurt many, including Arizona’s solar industry. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports. 

Embry-Riddle

Tonight the doors will open to northern Arizona’s first and only planetarium. It’s on the campus of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott and the creators hope it will inspire young people to embrace science and engineering careers. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny got a sneak preview.

On Saturday morning the residents of Hawaii received a text alert, warning of an imminent missile strike, only to learn it had been sent in error.  A similar mistake happened in Japan on Tuesday. These incidents have revived questions that people asked during the Cold War about how people prepare for and respond to the threat of a nuclear strike. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke to Dr. Richard Bloom, director of terrorism, intelligence and security studies at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott.


NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/USGS

A Flagstaff geologist found eight massive ice sheets on the planet Mars, using images from a NASA spacecraft. It’s the first detailed look at the layered structure of Mars’ ice. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports. 


Jim Rorabaugh/USFWS

The southwestern willow flycatcher will remain on the endangered species list, following a review of its status as a unique subspecies. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


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