Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

Ways to Connect

Melissa Sevigny

China is cracking down on what kind of recycling it buys from the rest of the world. That has ripple effects all the way to Flagstaff. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, a lot of the stuff you think should be recycled actually ends up in a landfill.


NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

In the last few years, Pluto has gone from being a fuzzy dot in the sky to a geologically active world of mountains, canyons, and heart-shaped glaciers. That’s thanks to NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, which sailed by Pluto in 2015 to photograph it up close for the first time. The mission’s leader Alan Stern is currently on a book tour and visits Flagstaff today. He spoke with KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny from the road.


Jason Burton/NPS

This year the nation marks the 50th anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. The law now protects almost 13,000 miles of the most remote and pristine waterways in the U.S.  

 

Melissa Sevigny

Starting today, City of Flagstaff residents can no longer recycle all types of plastic. Only rigid bottles and jugs will be accepted. The new policy has to do with changing recycling rules in China, where Flagstaff’s plastic ends up. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with the City of Flagstaff’s waste director Todd Hanson.


Center for Biological Diversity

The Bureau of Land Management will offer leases on forty-two hundred acres of public land near the Little Colorado River for oil and gas development. The decision comes after a federal ruling loosened the requirements for environmental review. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Pages